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History of Science Collections

Copernicus's De revolutionibus
De revolutionibus orbium coelestium (On the Revolutions of the Heavenly Spheres), written by Nicolaus Copernicus and published in 1543, presents Copernicus's evidence and arguments supporting heliocentric theory. This copy contains extensive marginalia from a circle of astronomers located in Paris in the decade following the book's publication. Additionally, Georg Rheticus's Narratio Prima, published in 1540 as a primer to De rev, was bound into this volume.

ePubs: Historic Texts in Geology
A series of historic texts in geology are being made available as enhanced ePubs for your iPad, iPhone, Nook, or other e-reading device. These ePub files are enhanced by sedimentary geochemist Robert D. Cody. Cody provides a helpful introduction to each author and work.

Online Galleries
The Online Galleries offer high resolution images of plates, engravings, portraits, title pages, and maps from the holdings of the History of Science Collections. For more information, please visit
About the Online Galleries.

Portraits
This collection features portraits of prominent figures from the history of science.

Rare Books
This collection features digital versions of rare books from the history of science ranging from Galileo's Sidereus Nuncius to Darwin's On The Origin of Species, in addition to works from Kepler, Copernicus, Huygens, and other significant figures in the history of science.

Scientific Instruments and Historical Artifacts
This collection presently features scientific instruments from the 19th and 20th centures, as well as an ancient Mesopotamian cuneiform tablet from a ziggurat located in southwestern Iran.

Title Pages
The University of Oklahoma has digitized the title pages of 8,300 books in the History of Science Collections. The purpose of the digitization project was to offer author/title access to the portion of items in the History of Science Collections which had not yet been cataloged. For this reason, the title pages are most helpfully accessed through the library catalog. Yet the title pages, although prepared for a different purpose, may also afford an opportunity to study printer’s devices, author’s autographs and other provenance markings which may appear.

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