Campbell, Walter Stanley (1877-1957)
Papers 1800-1964
77 feet
Professor. Personal correspondence (1897-1957); correspondence with Campbell's relatives (1822-1896); correspondence with publishers and literary agents (1920-1958); literary manuscripts (ca. 1914-1957); diaries, notebooks, and journals (1901-1926); and business papers (ca. 1925-1959) regarding Campbell's writings on the west, Indians, and Oklahoma, with emphasis on transportation, fortifications, cowboys, wars and battles, criminals and outlaws, and Indian chiefs, along with original Indian art by Carl Sweezy.
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Research Correspondence and Interviews for Sitting Bull, Champion of the Sioux: A Biography
1Untranslated statements and interviews in Sioux.
2Statements and interviews in English covering a variety of subjects, by unidentified participants.
3Correspondence with Chief Standing Bear, author of My People the Sioux.
a. correspondence regarding Sitting Bull with Buffalo Bill, 1928.
b. correspondence regarding the physical characteristics of Sitting Bull, 1928.
c. correspondence regarding Sitting Bull’s inability to speak English, 1928.
d. correspondence regarding the death of Sitting Bull, 1929.
e. correspondence regarding Agent McLaughlin, 1929.
f. correspondence regarding the fact that Sitting Bull was a medicine man and was not recognized as a warrior until the white man took him on trips through the East, 1929.
4The statement of Bears Ghost. Frank Zahn relates the statement regarding the Custer battle.
5The statement of Shoots Walking including:
a. the death of Sitting Bull
b. the wild west show
c. agency life
d. the relationship between James McLaughlin and Sitting Bull
6The statement of Little Soldier regarding:
a. Sitting Bull’s character and reputation among the Indians.
b. the death of Sitting Bull.
c. the Ghost Dance.
d. Sitting Bull’s association with Catherine Weldon.
7Correspondence with Robert P. Higheagle regarding Higheagle’s interview with the deaf step-son of Sitting Bull.
8Correspondence with Francis B. Bullhead regarding a request by Campbell to interview Indians.
9Correspondence with Brings Plenty, inviting Campbell to the reservation.
10Correspondence with Henry One Bull.
a. correspondence regarding the Hayfield fight.
b. correspondence from Campbell to his wife Isabel regarding his interviews with One Bull.
11Interviews and statements of Chief Henry Oscar One Bull.
a. interviews regarding Sitting Bull and the Sioux.
b. statement by Chief One Bull regarding the life of Sitting Bull from the Custer Fight until his surrender, 1878-1881.
c. Chief One Bull’s memoirs regarding the Sioux and Sitting Bull.
d. information regarding the boyhood of Sitting Bull, life in Canada, the Custer battle, the Sioux-Crow fights, reservation life, and the death of Sitting Bull.
12Correspondence and interviews with Chief Joseph White Bull.
a. the dress, horse, and shield of Sitting Bull.
b. the Ghost Dance and religion of the Sioux.
c. White Bull’s impression of the white man.
d. the life of White Bull.
e. conflicts with the Crow Indians.
f. Indian life, in general.
g. conflicts and battles with the Blackfoot Indians.
h. typescript of “Note on Wagon-Box Fight,” by Chief White Bull, 1867.
13Correspondence with Moses Old Bull.
a. correspondence regarding horse theft from the Crow Indians.
b. correspondence regarding sending Moses Old Bull’s statement to Campbell.
14The statements of Josephine Waggoner.
a. statements regarding Sitting Bull and John Grass, n.d.
b. statements regarding the period from 1881-1885, and how life on the reservation was made difficult by the acts of Bullhead and Shavehead, n.d.
c. affidavit by John F. Waggoner regarding whether the Indian police who killed Sitting Bull were drinking before they left for Sitting Bull’s camp, 1930.
d. typescript of “Sitting Bull at the Agency,” n.d.
e. an interview with Josephine Waggoner, n.d.
15Typescript of John Stands-in-Timber’s account of the Battle of the Little Bighorn River, by Don Rickey.
16Typescript of “Note on Chief Makes-Room of the Minneconnju” by his son, Joseph White Bull.
17Correspondence with Morris Bob Tail Bull regarding Sitting Bull.
18Songs by Sitting Bull.
a. twenty-five songs written by Sitting Bull with translations, collected and transcribed by Robert P. Higheagle, 1929.
b. typescript of “How Sitting Bull Got His Name,” by White Bull, n.d.
c. typescript of “A Crow Indian Spied in a Buffalo Horn Spoon,” by Sitting Bull, as told to his nephew, One Bull, n.d.
d. typescript of “Sitting Bull Interested in the Education of an Indian Boy,” by Bear Soldier, n.d.
e. typescript of “The Hat Sitting Bull Wears,” by Andrew Fox, n.d.
f. typescript of “Sitting Bull Adopts an Assiniboine Lad,” by One Bull, n.d.
g. typescript of “Why Sitting Bull Wears a White Eagle Feather as a Head Ornament,” by One Bull, n.d.
h. typescript of “Sitting Bull’s Advice to the Indian Students at a Mission School,” as told by E. D. White, n.d.
i. typescript of “Sitting Bull Wounded by the Crow Indians,” by One Bull, n.d.
j. typescript of “Why Sitting Bull Wears a Red Feather as a Head Ornament,” by One Bull, n.d.
k. typescript of “Sitting Bull Illustrates to the Silent Eater of the Way the Indians Tried to Stand in with the Indian Agent,” by White Bull, n.d.
19Correspondence, poetry, and drawings attributed to Sitting Bull.
a. poetry and correspondence reportedly written by Sitting Bull, n.d.
b. correspondence containing tracings of two drawings by Sitting Bull, 1936.
c. typescripts of works which claim Sitting Bull was literate, n.d.
20Correspondence with Anne One Bull Brown regarding personal matters, financial matters, and her children.
21Typescript accounts regarding the life of Sitting Bull.
a. “Sitting Bull’s Address to the Silent Eaters Protesting the Treaty of 1889,” by John Loneman.
b. “Sitting Bull’s Address to the Visiting Arikaras, Mandans and Gros Ventres.”
c. “Sitting Bull Illustrates to the Silent Eaters of the Way the Indians Tried to Stand in with the Indian Agent,” by White Bull, n.d.
d. “Sitting Bull Wounded by the Crow Indians,” by One Bull.
e. “Why Sitting Bull Wears a Red Feather as a Head Ornament,” by One Bull, n.d.
f. “Sitting Bull’s Advice to the Indian Students at a Mission School,” by E. D. White.
g. “Sitting Bull Helps the Old People,” by Bear Soldier.
h. “Why Sitting Bull Wears a White Eagle Feather as a Head Ornament,” by One Bull.
i. “Sitting Bull Donates Two Buffalos He Had Killed,” by Bear Soldier.
j. “A Coyote Foretells Sickness in Sitting Bull’s Family,” by One Bull.
k. “How Sitting Bull Got His Name,” by White Bull.
l. “Sitting Bull Adopts an Assiniboine Lad,” by One Bull.
m. “Sitting Bull Interested in the Education of an Indian Boy,” by Bear Soldier.
n. “Sitting Bull Finds Guilty Party Who Had Cruelly Killed a Valuable Horse,” by One Bull.
o. “The Hat Sitting Bull Wears,” by Andrew Fox, son-in-law.
p. “Sitting Bull Finds a Lost Pony for His Nephew,” by One Bull.
q. “Sitting Bull’s Act of Kindness,” by White Bull.
r. “Prophesy of Sitting Bull - Would Be Killed by His Own Race,” by One Bull.
s. “A Crow Indian Spied in a Buffalo-Horn Spoon,” by Chief Sitting Bull, as told to One Bull.
t. “Sitting Bull Restores a Crow Woman Captive,” by Bear Soldier.
u. "The Oxen That Laughed,” by Sitting Bull to One Bull.
v. “The Sioux Indian Legend of the Migration of Birds of the Black Hill Country,” by Chief Sitting Bull, retold by his nephew, One Bull. Translated by Robert Higheagle.
w. jokes told by Sitting Bull.
22Typescripts by Robert P. Higheagle.
a. “How Sitting Bull Was Made a Chief.” Includes information on the life of Sitting Bull, from notes taken by Higheagle, n.d.
b. Robert Higheagle gives an account of his memories of Sitting Bull, n.d.
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Research Notes and Interviews for Sitting Bull, Champion of the Sioux: A Biography
1Interview of Old Bull regarding:
a. Sitting Bull.
b. a fight on the north side of Arrow Creek, 1872.
2Continuation of Interview of Old Bull regarding:
a. Sitting Bull.
b. a fight on the north side of Arrow Creek, 1872.
3Interview of Old Bull regarding the fight on Scarf (Warbonnet) Creek.
4“Life of Sitting Bull,” by White Bull, as told by Old Bull and One Bull.
5Interviews of Andrew Fox and White Bull
a. interview with Andrew Fox regarding Sitting Bull’s death.
b. interview with White Bull regarding: 1. traveling with Sitting Bull from 1869-1876.
2. customs of the Indians and other stories.
3. description of White Bull’s wife and house.
6Interview of Old Bull regarding a fight with white men on the east side of the Rosebud where Black Crow was killed. Sitting Bull and Fool Bull were the leaders.
7Interview of Old Bull regarding the fight of the three stars at the headwaters of the Rosebud.
8Interview of White Bull regarding:
a. Sitting Bull and Sitting Bull’s father.
b. Jumping Bull.
c. training boys and horses for battle and buffalo hunting.
d. Sitting Bull in Canada.
e. Sitting Bull and the Sundance.
f. the Battle of the Little Bighorn River.
g. the Silent Eaters.
h. the Strong Hearts.
9Interview of Old Bull regarding a fight on the south side of Arrow Creek, near the bend of the Yellowstone River.
10Interview of Makes Trouble regarding:
a. the meeting of Sitting Bull and General Bliss to make the treaty of 1876.
b. a battle between Sitting Bull’s band and the Crow Indians.
11Interview of Old Bull regarding:
a. how Sitting Bull was made chief.
b. list of Sitting Bull’s battles.
c. the battle at Slim Buttes.
d. Marcus A. Reno and Rainy Buttes.
e. Sitting Bull’s police in Canada.
f. the Ghost Dance.
g. Sitting Bull’s death.
12Interview of Old Bull regarding:
a. when he was sent by Sitting Bull to see about reservation life.
b. the “Red Coats” and Sitting Bull in Canada.
c. Nez Perce with Sitting Bull.
d. a fight against Indians of French ancestry, 1873.
e. the Crow War, 1856.
f. the second half of the account of Sitting Bull’s death from notebook #11.
13Interviews of Antoine de Rockbrain and Circling Hawk.
a. Interview of Antoine de Rockbrain regarding: 1. the events leading up to the death of Sitting Bull.
2. Sitting Bull and Buffalo Bull.
b. Interview of Circling Hawk regarding: 1. the fight in which Sitting Bull is shot in the hip.
2. a Ree (Arikara) village fight.
3. the Battle of the Little Bighorn River.
4. Sitting Bull as a boy.
5. a fight with the Crow.
6. a Flathead fight.
7. a Crow fight over horses.
8. Sitting Bull is made chief.
9. the Silent Eaters.
10. the Soldier Police.
11. advice from Buffalo Bill.
Rosicrucian Materials
14Interviews of Frank Zahn and Gray Whirlwind.
a. Interview of Frank Zahn regarding the death of Sitting Bull.
b. Interview of Gray Whirlwind regarding: 1. the Battle of the Little Bighorn River
2. the Sundance.
3. talks with General Nelson A. Miles.
Research Notes and Interviews for Sitting Bull, Champion of the Sioux: A Biography
15Interview of Two Moons regarding the Battle of the Little Bighorn River.
16Interviews of Bob Tail Bull and Bishop Marty.
a. Interview of Bob Tail Bull regarding: 1. a trip to Canada and Sitting Bull in Canada.
2. the Sundance.
3. Sitting Bull’s police force.
b. Interview of Bishop Marty regarding Bullhead.
17Research notes.
a. abstracts of Sessional Papers regarding Sitting Bull in Canada.
b. a list of the Blackfoot chiefs.
18Interviews of Various Indians Regarding Sitting Bull in Canada.
a. J. Standing Buffalo (Sioux).
b. Otter Skin (Cree).
c. Silas Adams (Assiniboine).
d. Big Darkness (Assiniboine).
19Interviews of One Bull and Mrs. One Bull.
a. interview of One Bull regarding: 1. the Silent Eaters.
2. a fight with the Assiniboine.
3. the Battle of the Little Bighorn River.
4. Sitting Bull’s shield.
5. Sitting Bull’s Sundance dream.
6. medicine cloth.
7. Sitting Bull’s name.
8. a treaty with the “Red Coats” in Canada.
9. Sitting Bull is made chief.
10. whiskey.
11. Sitting Bull and Agent McLoud.
12. the death of Sitting Bull.
b. interview of Mrs. One Bull regarding Sitting Bull’s death.
20Interviews of Josephine Waggoner and Weasel Bear.
a. interview of Josephine Waggoner regarding the Indians of the reservation.
b. interview of Weasel Bear regarding: 1. the reservation police.
2. the death of Sitting Bull.
21Interview of White Bull regarding:
a. his good deeds.
b. the Crow fight.
c. a speech between some Utes, Sitting Bull, and the soldiers.
d. the Battle of the Little Bighorn River.
e. the Reynolds fight.
22Interview of White Bull regarding his life from the age of five. He gives a description of the socio-cultural life of an Indian.
23Continuation of Interview of White Bull regarding his life from the age of five.
24Continuation of Interview of White Bull. Includes a description of the Battle of the Little Bighorn River, and the later council with General Nelson A. Miles “Bear Coat.”
25Note and map of “100 Whites Killed Battle.”
26Interview of White Bull regarding winter stories.
27Interview of White Bull regarding the main events of each winter.
28Continuation of interview of White Bull regarding the main events of each winter. Includes some short stories on the life of White Bull.
29Research notes regarding:
a. the names of Indians killed.
b. translation of the names of the years from 1781-1932, in English and Sioux.
c. war songs.
d. translation of the names of White Bull’s family members, in English and Sioux.
30Research notes by Campbell regarding the Arapaho Sundance and societies.
32Research notes regarding the Sioux.
a. correspondence written by Father Jean Baptiste Marie Genin to the editor of the New York Freeman Journal regarding the Sioux Indians, 1876.
b. “Report of North Dakota State Historical Society,” from History of Dakota Territory by G. W. Kingsbury.
c. description of the Sioux scalp dance by Frank Zahn. Includes a short history of the Sioux and the men Zahn knew.
33Research notes regarding Sioux Indians and Sitting Bull.
34Continuation of research notes regarding Sioux Indians and Sitting Bull.
35Interview of Two Bull, and general information on the Sioux.
a. interview of Two Bull regarding: 1. Canada.
2. the Battle of the Little Bighorn River.
b. general information on Sitting Bull and the Sioux.
36General notes and interviews of Old Bull regarding Sitting Bull.
37Interview of Bob Tail Horse regarding Sitting Bull, and fights with Lieutenant “White Hat” Clark and General Nelson A. Miles, and the meetings after the fights. Includes some general research notes.
38Interviews of Mrs. Brown and Mrs. Old Bull, and Turning Hawk.
a. interview of Mrs. Brown and Mrs. Old Bull regarding Sitting Bull.
b. interview of Turning Hawk regarding: 1. the death of Sitting Bull.
2. the Battle of the Little Bighorn River.
39General notes on Sitting Bull.
41Interviews of Josephine Waggoner, Old Bull, One Bull, and Scarlet Whirlwind.
a. interview of Josephine Waggoner regarding Sitting Bull and the Ghost Dance.
b. interview of Old Bull regarding: 1. Sitting Bull in the Battle of the Little Bighorn River.
2. Crazy Horse and Gall.
3. life and war with Sitting Bull.
c. interview of One Bull regarding: 1. Sitting Bull on the reservation.
2. the death of Sitting Bull.
d. interview of Scarlet Whirlwind regarding the death of Sitting Bull.
42General notes on Sitting Bull.
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43Lists regarding:
a. people killed in various battles.
b. membership lists in various societies.
c. the wives of White Bull.
44Research notes on White Bull.
a. White Bull is made chief.
b. White Bull’s dreams.
c. White Bull on a buffalo hunt.
45Interview with White Bull regarding:
a. the Sundance.
b. one hundred white men killed.
c. White Bull brings in the Ute Indians for the U.S.
d. names of rivers.
e. snow blindness.
f. the dedication of Warpath, written in English.
46Warpath dedication and receipt.
a. White Bull’s dedication, in Sioux, of Warpath.
b. receipt for $70.00 payment to White Bull.
47Interview of White Bull regarding:
a. life on the reservation and buffalo hunting from the reservation.
b. how to make a fire.
c. advice from his father and mother.
d. advice he gave to friends.
e. getting frostbite.
f. punishment given by Indians to other Indians.
48The genealogy of Sitting Bull, and general notes on battles.
49Interview of Old Bull regarding the Battle of the Little Bighorn River, in Sioux and English.
50Interview of Old Bull regarding thirty Crows killed in fights.
51Interviews of H. C. Thompson and Old Bull.
a. interview of H. C. Thompson regarding General Miles fighting and talking to Sitting Bull.
b. interview of Old Bull regarding: 1. the fights with the whites.
2. the ditch digging fight.
52General notes by Campbell. Includes an interview of Iron Dog regarding:
a. Sitting Bull in Canada.
b. return from Canada.
c. the Battle of the Little Bighorn River.
53Interview of White Bull regarding:
a. going to the reservation.
b. an explanation of pictures in Sitting Bull’s calendar.
c. the Fetterman Fight of 1866.
d. jokes played by warriors.
e. the Wagon Box fight.
f. a white woman captive.
g. buffalo hunting with Sitting Bull and buffalo hunting.
h. horses.
i. a disagreement with the Indian police.
j. hair coat wearers.
k. White Bull’s wife.
54Interviews of White Bull, T. J. Thompson, Otter Robe, Eagle Boy, One Elk, and Gray Eagle.
a. an interview of White Bull regarding: 1. his election as chief.
2. his battle picture calendar.
b. interviews of T. J. Thompson, Otter Robe, Eagle Boy, One Elk, and Gray Eagle regarding the death of Sitting Bull.
55A chronology of Plains history.
56General notes by Campbell on Indian dances.
57General notes by Campbell regarding:
a. One Bull.
b. One Elk.
c. Old Bull.
d. Sitting Bull.
e. Long Man.
58General notes by Campbell on Indians.
59General notes by Campbell on Indians.
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Research Correspondence and Interviews for Sitting Bull, Champion of the Sioux: A Biography
1Research correspondence with A. B. Welch.
a. typescript order of James McLaughlin approving an Indian buffalo hunt, 1883.
b. typescript report regarding the arrest of Sitting Bull from John M. Carignan to James McLaughlin, 1890.
c. correspondence regarding Campbell’s purchase of drawings by Old Bull, 1928-1929.
d. correspondence regarding the death of Sitting Bull and the Indian police who died with him, 1928.
e. correspondence regarding the original contract for Sitting Bull to go on exhibition, 1928.
f. correspondence regarding copies made by Welch of Sitting Bull and Old Bull drawings, 1929.
g. correspondence regarding Campbell’s discovery that drawings copied from the tent of the Fast Horse family were not made by Sitting Bull, and that Welch has been misled, 1929.
h. a brief biography of Red Tomahawk, who killed Sitting Bull, 1931.
i. correspondence from Welch about sending original copies of James McLaughlin letters to Campbell, 1931.
j. correspondence from Welch regarding the treatment of Chief Grass in Sitting Bull,1932.
k. correspondence regarding Sitting Bull, 1928-1935.
2Research correspondence with Reginald Laubin.
a. news article regarding Laubin’s trip to the Dakotas from the Norwich Connecticut Record, 1937.
b. clipping of photographs from Laubin’s trip to North Dakota from The Hartford Courant, 1937.
c. correspondence from Laubin regarding a tipi seen on a trip to Fort Hall, Idaho, 1939.
3Research correspondence with A. M. Beede, Fort Yates, North Dakota.
a. correspondence regarding the youth of Sitting Bull, and speculation as to the “mission” of Sitting Bull, 1929.
b. correspondence regarding a biography of himself, and attempts to set the Sioux scene for Campbell, 1929.
c. correspondence regarding Indian torture, and Sitting Bull’s mercy killing of a tortured woman, 1929.
d. correspondence regarding the signature of Sitting Bull, 1929.
e. correspondence regarding Sitting Bull and Crazy Horse as friends; and Sitting Bull and religion, 1930.
f. correspondence regarding scalps taken by Sitting Bull and his coups, 1930.
g. a news article regarding Sitting Bull’s grave, and remarks from A. M. Beede regarding the unearthing of the grave, 1930.
h. correspondence praising Sitting Bull, 1932.
i. “Terrible Rat,” by A. M. Beede. n.d.
j. correspondence regarding Sitting Bull on whiskey, and his remarks after a trip to Washington, n.d.
k. “The Mysterious Animal Covered with Blanket,” n.d.
l. general research notes by Campbell, n.d.
4Research materials and correspondence from Major George P. Ahern.
a. copy of correspondence from Major Ahern to General Charles J. Summerall refusing an invitation to meet Red Tomahawk because he is the man accused by the Indians of killing Sitting Bull, 1929.
b. correspondence from Ahern proposing that Campbell write a book on famous Indian chiefs, 1929.
c. a series of questions about Sitting Bull, posed to Ahern in a letter from Campbell, 1929.
d. correspondence from Ahern, answering the questions posed to him by Campbell, 1929.
e. correspondence regarding the omission of the chapter on the period of Sitting Bull as a prisoner of war, 1932.
f. typescript of Forest Bankruptcy in America by George P. Ahern, n.d.
g. correspondence with Ahern regarding Sitting Bull.
5Research correspondence with Judge Frank Zahn.
a. correspondence Bullhead and Catch-the-Bear, 1929.
b. correspondence regarding: 1. the shirt of Sitting Bull showing his battle with a Crow Indian.
2. the sacred horse of the Sioux.
c. a brief autobiography of Zahn, 1931.
d. correspondence regarding “Buffalo Bill” Cody stopping at Zahn’s house on the way to the incident over the arrest of Sitting Bull, 1932. e. Sioux translations by Zahn for Campbell.
6Research correspondence with Frederick Weygold.
a. agreement regarding the sale of Happy Hunting Grounds, with the drawings by Weygold, 1920.
b. correspondence regarding preparation of text and drawings for Happy Hunting Grounds, 1920.
c. correspondence regarding photographs, 1928.
d. correspondence from Weygold regarding Red Cloud and Short Bull, 1928.
e. correspondence from Weygold regarding Sioux scalps, 1929.
f. correspondence from Weygold regarding a description of the “Hanble Ceyapi” ceremony, 1929.
g. correspondence from Weygold regarding ethnographic material in France, England, and Germany, 1930.
h. research correspondence with Weygold, 1916-1938.
7Research correspondence with V. T. McGillycuddy, former Indian agent.
a. correspondence regarding the biography of Sitting Bull, and accounts of McGillycuddy’s experiences with Sitting Bull, 1928.
b. correspondence regarding Red Cloud and the Sundance, 1929.
c. correspondence from McGillycuddy regarding reminiscences of the Ghost Dance, Wounded Knee, and religion in the 1880s and 1890s, n.d.
d. research correspondence with McGillycuddy, 1928-1929.
8Research correspondence with Chauncey Thomas.
a. correspondence regarding Sitting Bull’s attendance at the University of Missouri, 1928.
b. correspondence regarding the signature of Sitting Bull, 1928.
c. correspondence regarding “Buffalo Bill” Cody and Sitting Bull, 1928.
d. translations of well-known Indian names, 1928.
e. articles regarding Sitting Bull, which Thomas suggests Campbell include in his book, 1929.
f. correspondence regarding Buffalo Bill, the wild west show, and the signature of Sitting Bull, 1928-1929.
9Research correspondence with Lewis F. Crawford, to whom Sitting Bull, Champion of the Sioux: A Biography was dedicated.
a. correspondence regarding James McLaughlin, Buffalo Bill, and Sitting Bull, 1928.
b. excerpt from A Warrior Who Fought Custer, interpreted by Thomas B. Marquis, 1931.
c. correspondence about acquiring statements and accounts of Sioux activities from Thomas’s bookstore in Denver, and from the Historical Society of North Dakota, 1929-1933.
d. correspondence regarding Sitting Bull research, 1929-1933.
10Research correspondence with George Bird Grinnell.
a. correspondence regarding the torture of captives, 1929.
b. correspondence from W. S. Gilman of the Committee on Reduction of Governmental Expenditures regarding Louis LeGare and Sitting Bull, n.d.
c. correspondence regarding Cheyenne tipis, Sitting Bull, and White Bull, 1923-1933.
11A list of addresses used by Campbell in his research correspondence.
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Research Correspondence for Sitting Bull, Champion of the Sioux: A Biography
1Research correspondence, “A”
a. correspondence with Martin Abernathy, 1929.
b. correspondence with Annie H. Abel regarding publications with speeches of Sioux leaders, 1929.
c. correspondence with Edwin P. Andrus, 1929.
d. correspondence with Frank Aydelotte, 1931.
e. correspondence with Adventure Magazine regarding an article which gives a distorted view of the Sioux, 1932.
f. correspondence from the Army War College containing a list of Signal Corps numbers, 1933.
g. miscellaneous research correspondence “A,” 1929-1933.
2Research correspondence “B”
a. correspondence with the Bureau of American Ethnology regarding research and photographs, 1913-1933.
b. correspondence from P. E. Byrne regarding Sitting Bull’s grave and old timers, 1928-1932.
c. correspondence with W. H. C. Bowen regarding his recollections of Sitting Bull and those who knew him when in the field with General Nelson A. Miles, 1929.
d. correspondence with Gertrude Bonnin of the National Council of American Indians, 1929.
e. correspondence from Reverend Bernard Strassmaier, Fort Yates Catholic Indian Mission, regarding General George A. Custer, Ben White, Grey Eagle, Catherine Weldon, and Sitting Bull, 1929.
f. correspondence with E. Douglas Branch regarding Sitting Bull, 1929. g. correspondence with Mrs. Frank Baldwin regarding General Frank D. Baldwin and Sitting Bull battles, 1929.
h. correspondence with F. G. Burnett regarding Sitting Bull, 1929.
i. correspondence with Charles W. Bocker, 1929.
j. correspondence from Renie Burdett praising Campbell for Sitting Bull, Champion of the Sioux: A Biography, 1932.
k. correspondence with Barron Brown regarding a famous horse, named Comanche, 1933.
l. correspondence with John S. Wright regarding Sitting Bull, 1942.
m. an article written by Reverend Bernard Strassmaier regarding Standing Rock history, n.d.
n. general research correspondence “B,” 1929-1957.
3Research correspondence “C”
a. a rejection by Cosmopolitan Magazine for Campbell’s Sitting Bull story, 1929.
b. correspondence with E. H. Crowder regarding the location of Sitting Bull and the Sioux in 1889, 1929.
c. correspondence with J. C. Cooper regarding problems caused to Cooper’s freight train by Sitting Bull, 1929.
d. correspondence from S. C. Derby regarding Thomas L. Riggs, 1930. e. correspondence from John E. Brughiere regarding his uncle, Johnny Brughiere. Includes a map of Sitting Bull’s travels, 1932.
f. general research correspondence “C,” 1927-1933.
4Research correspondence “D”
a. correspondence with Tyler Bennett regarding papers available on Sitting Bull in Canada, 1929.
b. correspondence with Henry W. Daly regarding Sitting Bull, 1930.
c. correspondence from T. B. Donaldson commenting upon Buffalo Bill and George A. Custer, Sitting Bull, and the Fetterman Fight, 1933.
d. general research correspondence “D,” 1929-1934.
5Research correspondence “F”
a. correspondence with W. E. Foster regarding people Campbell could speak to about Sitting Bull, 1931.
b. correspondence with Lawrence K. Fox of the South Dakota State Historical Society regarding attached clipping “Facts on Sitting Bull Are Cited,” by Doane Robinson, 1939.
c. general research correspondence “F,” 1929-1949.
6Research correspondence “G”
a. correspondence from Charles N. Gould, Oklahoma Geological Survey, regarding C. F. Colcord, Fred Sutton, and J. B. Thoburn, 1928. b. correspondence with James H. Cook regarding Red Cloud and Sitting Bull, 1928.
c. correspondence from E. A. Garlington regarding Sitting Bull, 1929.
d. correspondence from W. J. Ghent regarding his sketch and bibliography of Sitting Bull, 1929.
e. correspondence with Henry N. Graven regarding his father, T. J. Thompson, 1930.
f. correspondence from Campbell to Houghton Mifflin asking for an advance on Sitting Bull of $400.00, June, 1931.
g. general research correspondence “G,” 1928-1945.
7Research correspondence “H”
a. correspondence from W. T. Hornaday of the Permanent Wild Life Protection Fund regarding destruction of buffalo herds, 1929.
b. correspondence with Witzleben regarding Witzleben’s contact with Sitting Bull, 1929.
c. statement of money paid to R. P. Higheagle and correspondence regarding the fifty or more songs translated from Sioux and general correspondence, 1929-1930.
d. correspondence from DeWitt Hare regarding Sitting Bull, 1932.
e. correspondence from J. D. Hill regarding photographs of Sitting Bull, 1932.
f. correspondence with Mabel Martin Hay regarding her childhood memories of living at Fort Yates during the time Sitting Bull was there, 1933.
g. correspondence with G. Hotz in Switzerland who has the supposed quiver of Sitting Bull, 1934-1936.
h. correspondence with Albert G. Heath of the Museum of Amerind Arts regarding prices of Sitting Bull’s medicine bundle, crucifix, gun, and photographs, 1935.
i. correspondence with Anna Hertzog regarding a newspaper story about her father with mention of Sitting Bull, 1957.
j. general research correspondence “H,” 1929-1957.
8General research correspondence “J”
9Research correspondence “K”
a. correspondence from Henry McKay regarding the life of Sitting Bull, 1930.
b. correspondence with Henry McKay regarding praise of Sitting Bull, 1932.
c. correspondence from Thomas Kearny regarding General Stephen Kearny, n.d.
10Research correspondence “L”
a. correspondence with Robert H. Lowie of the Department of Anthropology, University of California, regarding Campbell’s request for $500 to complete Sitting Bull, 1924.
b. correspondence with Robert Lindneaux regarding Sitting Bull, 1928.
c. correspondence with A. J. Larson regarding charges for research work, 1929.
d. correspondence with Frank B. Linderman regarding his review of Sitting Bull and general Indian information, 1930-1932.
e. correspondence with Howard B. Lott regarding general Indian information, 1937.
f. general research correspondence “L,” 1928-1947.
11Research correspondence “M”
a. correspondence with E. D. Mossman, Department of the Interior, regarding Sitting Bull’s personality, 1928.
b. correspondence with the Minnesota Historical Society, 1928-1933.
c. correspondence from Henry Allen Moe regarding storage of notes on Sitting Bull, 1930.
d. correspondence to Houghton Mifflin Company from Campbell regarding another printing of Sitting Bull, 1953.
e. general research correspondence “M,” 1928-1953.
12Research correspondence “N”
a. correspondence with John G. Neihardt regarding Crazy Horse, 1930.
b. correspondence from Elmo Scott Watson of Northwestern University regarding a list of photographs of Sitting Bull, 1949.
c. general research correspondence “N,” 1928-1949.
Research Correspondence and Interviews for Sitting Bull, Champion of the Sioux: A Biography
13Research correspondence “P”
a. correspondence with Kenneth W. Porter regarding Chief Buffalo Child Long Lance, 1932-1933.
b. general research correspondence “P,” 1928-1933.
Research Correspondence for Sitting Bull, Champion of the Sioux: A Biography
14Research correspondence “P”
a. correspondence with Ralph H. Ross regarding Sitting Bull, 1928-1929.
b. correspondence from Col. Hugh T. Reed regarding the days in the Dakotas with the Army in Sitting Bull’s times, 1929.
c. correspondence from Col. George Ruhlen regarding army officers who might have information on Sitting Bull, 1929.
d. correspondence with Reverend George W. Reed regarding Sitting Bull, 1929.
e. correspondence with Thomas Riggs regarding Sitting Bull, 1930.
f. correspondence with R. B. Roberts regarding John Loneman, John P. Higheagle, and Many Eagles, 1939.
g. general research correspondence “R,” 1928-1939.
15Research correspondence “S”
a. correspondence with Lawrence K. Fox of the South Dakota Historical Society, 1928-1933.
b. correspondence with M. F. Steele regarding the death of Sitting Bull, 1929.
c. correspondence from G. H. Search regarding Sitting Bull’s daughter’s buck skin dress, 1932.
d. correspondence with E. M. Saunders regarding Sitting Bull, 1933.
e. correspondence from John C. Ewers from the Smithsonian Institution regarding guns owned by Sitting Bull, 1952.
f. general research correspondence “S,” 1928-1952.
16Research correspondence “T”
a. correspondence with Richard Tanner regarding Sitting Bull’s name, and James McLaughlin, 1928-1929.
b. correspondence from Grace Thomas regarding general Indian information, 1933.
c. correspondence with W. H. Tackett. Includes a newspaper clipping, “The Indian Helped to Make Us Great,” 1957.
17Research correspondence “U”
a. correspondence with the University of Wyoming regarding Sitting Bull research, 1928-1933.
b. correspondence from the United States Department of the Interior regarding Sitting Bull, 1929.
c. correspondence with the University of Michigan, 1930.
d. general research correspondence “U,” 1930-1957.
18Research correspondence “V-Y”
a. correspondence from Philip Watan regarding Arapaho dance, 1929. b. correspondence with Charles A. Varnum regarding Sitting Bull, 1929.
c. correspondence with Mamie L. Weeden regarding Sitting Bull and Red Cloud, 1929.
d. correspondence with Josephine Waggoner regarding Sitting Bull, Shell King, One Bull, James McLaughlin, and others, 1929-1941.
e. correspondence from Eugene Younghawk regarding “old timers” Campbell may talk to about Sitting Bull, 1930.
f. a four-page account of Sioux affairs by John F. Waggoner, n.d.
g. general research correspondence “V-Y,” 1928-1945.
Box 109
Folder
Post-Publication Research Correspondence for Sitting Bull, Champion of the Sioux: A Biography
1Research correspondence "A-B"
a. correspondence with Joseph Blickensderfer regarding praise of Sitting Bull, 1933.
b. correspondence from the Army War College regarding a request for Sitting Bull material, 1934.
c. correspondence with Raymond A. Burnside regarding a survey and exploration of the Slim Buttes battlefield, 1952.
d. correspondence with Harold D. Bugbee regarding Bugbee’s painting, Making Meat, 1952.
e. correspondence to the Louisville Times from Reginald Laubin regarding an article about Sitting Bull, 1954.
f. general research correspondence “A-B,” 1933-1939.
2Research correspondence "C"
a. correspondence with A. R. Chapin regarding Chapin’s disagreement with selected points in Sitting Bull, 1932.
b. a newsletter from Houghton Mifflin Company which includes an article regarding Sitting Bull’s signature on the cover of Sitting Bull, 1932.
c. correspondence from Campbell regarding a negative review of Sitting Bull, 1933.
d. a list of articles Campbell is willing sell to the Oklahoma Historical Society, 1935.
e. correspondence with Rudolph Cronau regarding praise of Sitting Bull, 1936.
f. correspondence with Mrs. H. O. Cypert regarding Sitting Bull’s genealogy, 1952-1953.
g. general research correspondence “C,” 1935-1953.
3Research correspondence "G-H"
a. correspondence with C. W. Griffith regarding Griffith’s questions about Sitting Bull, 1933.
b. correspondence with Zoa Grace Hawley regarding the tipis of Sitting Bull while on the Little Big Horn River, 1937.
c. correspondence from James Hutchins regarding the Bozeman Party expedition of 1874, including information on the Sioux Wars, 1956.
d. general research correspondence “G-H,” 1933-1957.
4Research correspondence "J-L"
a. correspondence from Reginald Laubin regarding two Indian men who claim to be Sitting Bull’s sons, 1935.
b. correspondence with Herman Kahn regarding copies of Indian council proceedings, 1946.
c. newspaper clipping, “Mystery of Sitting Bull” from The Denver Post, 1953.
d. correspondence with William Johnson regarding the second edition of Sitting Bull, 1957.
e. correspondence with Elizabeth Lochrie regarding a smoke-tanned elk hide, 1957.
f. general research correspondence “J-L,” 1935-1957.
5Research correspondence "M-N"
a. correspondence with Edward A. Milligan regarding incorrect information about Sitting Bull in another author’s book, 1939.
b. correspondence from J. Raymond McIllree regarding photographs of Sitting Bull, American Horse, and Wolf Robe, 1948.
c. correspondence with Earl Marshall regarding the burial of Crazy Horse, 1957.
6Research correspondence "P"
a. a copy of correspondence to Ray Lyman Wilbur from George P. Ahern regarding Ahern’s contact with Indians, 1929.
b. correspondence with E. Dudley Parsons regarding praise of Sitting Bull, 1932-1933.
c. correspondence with John F. Palmer regarding Palmer’s Indian family history, 1934.
d. correspondence from Gene Price regarding the Sioux in South Dakota. Attached is a news clipping, “Sitting Bull’s Bones Rest In New Grave,” 1953.
e. correspondence with D. C. Pope regarding the Teton Sioux and Sitting Bull, 1957.
7Research correspondence "R-T"
a. correspondence with J. A. Steele regarding Sitting Bull, 1933.
b. correspondence from Dick Stone regarding Devil’s Tower, Wyoming. Includes a typescript of notes from an interview with Old Bull and White Bull regarding Devil’s Tower, 1934.
c. correspondence with Gene Price regarding general Indian information, 1949.
d. correspondence with Don M. Ream, Jr., regarding Edward Ryan, who claims to be the sole survivor of the Battle of the Little Bighorn River, 1954.
e. correspondence with John L. Stemenson regarding praise of Sitting Bull, 1957.
f. correspondence with Ruth K. Smith regarding Crazy Bull, the Ghost Dance, and her collection of Blackfoot articles, 1957.
g. correspondence with Grace B. Thomas regarding Sitting Bull and General George A. Custer, 1957.
h. general research correspondence “R-T,” 1933-1957.
8Research correspondence “U-W”
a. correspondence with Charles E. Nickles regarding the sale of Sitting Bull’s peace pipe, 1933.
b. correspondence with Col. Willis Uline regarding the people he met while stationed at Fort Yates, North Dakota, 1933.
c. correspondence with Harold E. Nish regarding a photograph of Sitting Bull and white men, 1956.
d. correspondence with Ralph Velich regarding his visit to Sitting Bull’s grave, 1957.
e. general research correspondence “U-W,” 1933-1957.
9Research correspondence
a. correspondence from E. T. Seton identifying himself and a friend in a picture from New Sources of Indian History, 1934.
b. correspondence with the Museum of Science and Industry (Chicago) regarding identification of the pistol used to kill Sitting Bull, 1944.
c. correspondence with Supt. Edward Luce, Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument, 1952, regarding: 1. Campbell’s offer to sell a saddlebag from the Battle of the Little Bighorn River.
2. the identity of the killer of General George A. Custer.
d. correspondence from Edward Luce regarding George A. Custer’s height, 1952.
e. correspondence with the Smithsonian Institution regarding the carbine used by Sitting Bull, 1952.
f. correspondence from Campbell to Life Magazine regarding the transfer of Sitting Bull’s body to South Dakota, 1953.
g. correspondence with the Kalamazoo Public Museum regarding Sitting Bull’s shield and other items, 1956.
h. general research correspondence, 1929-1957.
10Research correspondence with Don Rickey of the Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument.
a. correspondence regarding buffalo hunting, 1955.
b. correspondence regarding Indian firearms, 1956.
c. correspondence regarding the Battle of the Little Bighorn, n.d.
d. various correspondence with Don Rickey, 1955-1956.
11Research correspondence with E. A. Brininstool.
a. correspondence regarding V. T. McGillycuddy, A. R. Chapin, and William F. “Buffalo Bill” Cody, 1928.
b. correspondence regarding the arrest and burial of Sitting Bull, 1929.
c. correspondence regarding photos and maps by E. A. Brininstool, 1928-1933.
12Research correspondence with Joseph Balmer.
a. correspondence regarding Rain-in-the-Face and White Horse Eagle, 1934.
b. correspondence regarding Buffalo Child Long Lance, Standing Bear, and White Horse Eagle, 1946.
c. correspondence regarding the duel between Buffalo Bill and Yellow Hand, 1948.
d. correspondence regarding Mari Sandoz and her book about Crazy Horse, 1948.
e. correspondence regarding a debate about a photograph of Red Cloud, 1949.
f. correspondence regarding Little Wolf’s opinion of White Bull’s story of Custer, 1957.
g. general research correspondence, 1934-1957.
Box 110
Folder
Research Materials for Sitting Bull, Champion of the Sioux: A Biography
1Typescripts of reports and records of the Office of Indian Affairs, Department of the Interior.
a. a speech by Bear Rib, 1858.
b. reports from Fort Laramie, Wyoming, 1866.
c. a report of the Department of the Interior, Office of Indian Affairs, 1867.
d. a report of the Secretary of War, 1867-1868.
e. a report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, 1868.
f. a report from the House of Representatives regarding Indian conditions, 1868.
g. a report on the Headquarters Middle District, Fort Sully, 1869.
h. a report of the Assistant Secretary of the Interior, 1872.
i. a report entitled, “The Indians and the Railroads,” 1872.
j. a report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs regarding a Northern Cheyenne raid and the Sioux War, 1876.
k. a report of the Office of Indian Affairs, 1876.
l. a report of the Office of Indian Affairs, Dakota Superintendency, 1877.
m. a report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, 1877.
n. a report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, 1878.
o. a report of the Sioux Commission, 1878.
p. a report entitled, “Northern Cheyenne Raid,” 1878.
q. a report from the Crow Agency, 1879.
r. Senate Executive Document No. 70, regarding separate reservations for Sioux bands, 1882.
s. testimony of the Senate Committee regarding the condition of Indian tribes in the territories of Montana and Dakota, 1883.
t. a report of the Office of Indian Affairs, 1883.
u. various reports from tribal agencies, 1864-1878.
v. various reports of the Office of Indian Affairs, 1858-1877.
2Typescripts of the Office of Indian Rights Association.
a. a report entitled, “An Independent Investigation of the Recent Disturbances on Sioux Reservation…,” 1890.
b. a report entitled, “The Indians,” 1890.
c. a report entitled, “The Present Need of the Indian School Service,” 1890.
d. extracts from the Sioux Falls Press, 1890.
e. a report entitled, “A Contrast,” 1891.
f. a report entitled, “A Crisis in Indian Affairs,” 1891.
g. a report entitled, “The Sioux Outbreak,” n.d.
h. a report entitled, “The Murder of the Indian Few Tails by Whites, and of Lieutenant Casey by the Indian Plenty Horses,” n.d.
3Typescript research materials regarding Father Pierre De Smet, S. J.
a. typescript of Journal of the Expedition to the Powder River Dept by Major Charles E. Galpin (unpublished) regarding peace made with Sitting Bull by Father De Smet, 1868.
b. typescript of an article in the Sioux City Journal regarding the 1868 mission of De Smet, 1926.
c. typescript excerpt of De Smet’s Life and Travels, Volume I.
5Typescript and printed research materials regarding the Grand Council of the Plains.
6Research materials regarding the pictographic war record of Sitting Bull.
a. correspondence from F. B. Bullhead regarding elder Indians who could tell Campbell about Sitting Bull, 1930.
b. typescript list entitled, “Exploits of Sitting Bull,” regarding major events in Sitting Bull’s life, n.d.
c. a descriptive key to the drawings of Sitting Bull’s war record, n.d.
d. photocopies of forty-five drawings of Sitting Bull’s war record.
8Research materials regarding historical accounts by One Bull, and genealogical material for Sitting Bull.
a. the genealogical chart of Sitting Bull, n.d.
b. a historical account by One Bull entitled, “Prophesy of Sitting Bull of a Disastrous Year, 1889-1890,” n.d.
c. typescript of “Prophesy of Sitting Bull - of Complete Annihilation of Custer and His Soldiers” as told to One Bull. n.d.
d. an incomplete typescript excerpt from The Book of the American Indian by Hamlin Garland, regarding the Hunkpapa Sioux, n.d.
e. various excerpts and notes regarding the Sioux.
9Correspondence with Martha Keen O’Neal regarding the translation of Sitting Bull to Braille.
Box 111
Folder
Research Materials and Correspondence Regarding the Battle of the Little Bighorn River, after the 1932 Publication of Sitting Bull, Champion of the Sioux: A Biography
1Research correspondence after the publication of Sitting Bull.
a. correspondence from C. H. Asbury regarding comments on the Battle of the Little Bighorn River by Theo Goldin, 1934.
b. correspondence from Pink Simms regarding why Gen. George A. Custer could not send a man back to the fort, 1934.
c. newspaper clipping by Lewis Gannett regarding Warpath and Council Fire, 1948.
d. a program for the dedication of the Museum Administration Building at the Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument, 1952.
e. correspondence with Austin H. Phelps of Adventure Magazine regarding comments of Little Wolf on the recent issue about White Bull killing Custer. Attached is the newspaper clipping, “Chief Snorts His Dissent,” 1957.
f. a copy of L. K. Birdwell’s “Custer Was Maligned,” from the Rocky Mountain News of Denver, 1957.
g. article typescript regarding Custer’s girlfriend during the Civil War, by Frederick C. Othman, 1957.
h. correspondence from John K. Standish criticizing an article by Campbell in American Heritage, 1957.
i. correspondence with M. A. Thomas and article typescript, “Custer’s Last Stand,” 1957.
j. correspondence with Dudley Martin of the Institute of Life Insurance regarding life insurance on Custer and others, 1957.
k. correspondence with Karl F. Zeisler regarding Campbell’s White Bull story, 1957.
l. excerpt from Custer’s Last Stand Legend or Blunder? by Robert Crichton with David Miller, 1957.
m. letters to newspaper editors regarding George A. Custer by Estelle Aubrey Brown, 1957.
n. general research correspondence and notes, 1955-1957.
2Typescripts and news clippings regarding the Battle of the Little Big Horn River.
a. the first account of the battle, a reprint from the Tribune, Bismarck, South Dakota, July 6, 1876.
b. a map of Custer, South Dakota, 1924.
c. an article typescript from the Denver Post regarding the battle, 1934.
d. newspaper photographs of Young Man Afraid of His Horses, General George Forsyth, Buffalo Bill, Rain-in-the-Face, and Sitting Bull, 1937.
e. “Crazy Horse, Who Led the Sioux at Custer’s Last Fight” from the New York Times Book Review, 1942.
f. National Park Service pamphlet, Custer Battle National Monument, 1956.
g. “Who Killed Custer” by Reginald Laubin, Adventure Magazine, in which White Bull is named as the killer, 1955.
h. announcement clipping of an American Heritage article by Campbell, 1957.
i. letters to the editor of the Arizona Daily Star, criticizing Campbell’s article in American Heritage, 1957.
j. “Where is Custer’s Gold,” by D. D. Dotson, Denver Post, 1957.
k. “Identity of General Custer’s Slayer Revealed by Writer; Secret Kept Until Indian Died,” from The Wichita Eagle, 1957.
l. “Indian Who ‘Killed Custer’ Tells of Fight to Death,” from The Lincoln Star, 1957.
m. article by Eagle Bear of the Sioux regarding the Battle of the Little Big Horn River, n.d.
n. news clipping of “Massacre of Custer Retold as Indian Warrior Recalls Slaughter,” n.d.
o. “Custer’s Last Secret Was Well Kept,” from Denver Rocky Mountain News, n.d.
3Maps regarding the Battle of the Little Big Horn River.
a. an enlarged National Park Service map of the battlefield, 1908.
b. a map of the battlefield showing deceased troopers, n.d.
4A reprint of a Westerner’s Brand Book issue regarding George A. Custer.
5Typescripts regarding the Battle of the Little Big Horn River.
a. typescript of the report from the Darlington Agency recounting the battle from the tales of the Cheyenne, 1876.
b. an article regarding Willie Turtle’s mother’s statement that a Ute killed Custer, not a Cheyenne or Sioux, 1957.
c. Waukutemonie’s story of ‘Custer’s Last Stand,’ n.d.
d. the story of the battle as told by Tasina-mani-win, n.d.
e. an article entitled, “Fate of Lt. Harrington,” n.d.
f. a typescript account of part of the battle, as told by J. K. Dixon in The Vanishing Race, n.d.
6Research excerpts regarding the Battle of the Little Big Horn River.
a. excerpt from She Watched Custer’s Last Battle, 1927.
b. excerpts from The Custer Fight, Captain Benteen’s Story of the Battle of Little Big Horn, 1933.
c. excerpts from P. F. Walls’ unpublished memoirs regarding the story of Crow Dog and Lt. Harrington, n.d.
d. typescript of an article, “Reno’s Scout; Custer’s Jealousy,” n.d.
e. partial typescript entitled, “Official Report of Custer Disaster,” n.d.
f. typescript of “The Fight,” n.d.
g. various research typescripts regarding the Battle of the Little Big Horn River, n.d.
7Research correspondence regarding General George A. Custer.
a. typescript of correspondence to Mrs. G. K. Harrington regarding the death of her son, Lt. Harrington, 1900.
b. correspondence from LeRoy Hafen regarding Colonel John Milton Chivington and General Frank D. Baldwin, 1929-1932.
c. Fred L. Rogers’s story about a man in the Battle of the Little Big Horn River, 1932.
d. correspondence with Charles Francis Bates regarding George A. Custer, 1932.
e. correspondence with R. B. Roberts regarding Chief Buffalo Child Long Lance, 1939.
Box 112
Folder
Research materials on military campaigns for Sitting Bull, Champion of the Sioux: A Biography
1Research correspondence regarding the following topics:
a. the activities of the hostile Sitting Bull band near Fort Peck in 1880. b. the Reynolds-Crazy Horse battlefield.
c. corrections in Campbell’s map showing the location of the Wagon Box Fight, the Fetterman Fight, and Fort Phil Kearny.
d. Indian maneuvers prior to the Crook fight on the Rosebud Creek.
e. Indians located at the Fort Peck Agency in 1874.
f. Dr. James Ferguson’s account of how his father might have been with Gen. George A. Custer, had it not been for a promotion. Includes accounts of Fort Sisseton, Fort Hale, and Fort Bennett.
g. correspondence of Nelson G. Edwards regarding army life in the old West.
h. correspondence discussing an Indian engagement 40 miles south of Fort Connor (Fort Reno, Wyoming) in July, 1865.
i. correspondence from James S. Hutchins regarding the “six-pounder iron gun” used against the Indians on the Bozeman Trail, the fight with the Bozeman party in 1874 on the Rosebud, and comments on Chief Red End of Horn (He-intpa-luta) and High Back Bone.
2Research materials and correspondence with Brigadier General W. C. Brown regarding:
a. a newspaper clipping regarding J. J. Reynolds’ attack on Crazy Horse’s Village on the Powder River in 1876.
b. account of F. D. Baldwin’s attack on Sitting Bull.
c. accounts of Sitting Bull’s activities with other tribes and the U.S. Army.
d. biographical information on Jumping Bull.
e. a fragment of a map of the Reynolds Fight, with correspondence explaining it.
f. typescript of correspondence to F. D. Baldwin from Sgt. Will O. Everetts regarding how he was treated in Sitting Bull’s camp, and how he had to threaten to kill Sitting Bull in order to make his escape, n.d.
g. research correspondence regarding biographical information on Nelson A. Miles and F. D. Baldwin, 1932.
h. typescript excerpts from F. D. Baldwin’s diary regarding Johnny Brughiere, and Baldwin’s engagement with Sitting Bull in 1876.
i. typescript lists of Indian battles with the U.S. Army, with dates and numbers killed and wounded on both sides, n.d.
j. correspondence regarding the location where Yellow Hair was killed by William F. “Buffalo Bill” Cody.
3Research correspondence regarding maps, photographs of battlefields, and routes.
4Excerpt from Proceedings and Collections of the Nebraska State Historical Society, 2nd Series, Volume II, with an account of the expedition that led to the killing of Sitting Bull.
5Excerpt from Collections of the State Historical Society of North Dakota, Volume I, giving an account of Nelson Miles’ engagements with Sitting Bull and of the Indians’ lack of weapons.
6Typescript research materials.
a. excerpts from Report of the Secretary of War. Includes reports of Lt. Col. E. T. Otis, Captain Charles W. Miner from Sitting Bull, and Nelson Miles regarding his talks with the Indians and the engagement that immediately followed, 1876.
b. a report by General Alfred H. “Star” Terry regarding Indian engagements, 1869.
c. typescript entitled, “Reminiscences of the Indian Fight at Ash Hollow, 1855,” by General Richard C. Drum.
d. a partial typescript of the Report of the Secretary of War, 1881.
e. report regarding the history Fort Randall, South Dakota, 1927.
f. a list of U.S. military posts in Dakota Territory, ca. 1881.
7Typescript excerpt from the Report of Commissioner of Indian Affairs: The Sioux War, 1877, giving an account of the engagements between the U.S. Army and Sitting Bull.
8Typescript excerpt from Our Indian Wards by George W. Maypenny.
9Typescript excerpt from Five Years a Dragoon by Percival G. Lowe.
10Typescript excerpt from My Story by Brigadier General Anson Mills.
11Typescript excerpt from The Fighting North and Pawnee Scouts by Robert Bruce.
12Typescript excerpt from History of North Dakota, compiled by W. B. Hennessy, giving accounts of the Battle of Killdeer Mountain and the Fisk Expedition.
13Typescript excerpt from History of the Powder River Indian Expedition of 1865, by H. E. Palmer, U.S. Army Captain, retired. This was read before the Kansas Loyal Legion meeting.
14Typescript excerpt from Hostile Indians.
15Typescript excerpt from Record of Engagements with Hostile Indians within the Military Division of the Missouri. Lt. General P. H. Sheridan commanding.
16Typescript excerpt from the report of Lt. General P. H. Sheridan, Headquarters, Military Division of the Missouri.
17Typescript excerpt from Harper’s Weekly, “Indian Wars of the U.S.,” by Frederic Remington.
18Typescript excerpt from The Sully Expeditions by George W. Kingsnorth.
19Typescript excerpts.
a. excerpt from The Ghost Dance Religion by James Mooney, n.d.
b. untitled excerpts regarding Indian engagements, n.d.
Excerpts from The W. M. Camp Records of Indian War History by Brigadier General W. C. Brown.
Box 113
Folder
Research Materials on Wild West Shows, and Life at the Agency for Sitting Bull, Champion of the Sioux: A Biography
1Typescript excerpts regarding the wild west show.
a. typescript of “The Wild West: Buffalo Bill’s Exhibition at the Woodbine,” from the Globe, 1885.
b. excerpt from Annie Oakley by Courtney Ryley Cooper, 1927.
c. excerpt from Campaigns of General Custer and Sitting Bull by Judson Elliott Walker, n.d.
2Research materials and correspondence with Johnny Baker regarding the wild west show.
a. correspondence with Johnny Baker regarding the attempt to acquire Sitting Bull for the show in 1886, 1929.
b. typescripts of a statement by Johnny Baker regarding Sitting Bull’s participation in the show, n.d.
3Research correspondence regarding the wild west show.
a. correspondence with Beth C. Jones regarding Sitting Bull, 1928.
b. correspondence with Richard J. Walsh, 1928-1933.
c. correspondence with Frank Goings regarding Sitting Bull in Philadelphia, 1929.
d. correspondence with George W. Miller, Miller Bros. 101 Ranch, regarding Buffalo Bill’s wild west show, 1928.
d. general correspondence regarding wild west shows, 1928-1955.
4Typescript research materials regarding reservation and agency life.
a. “Sitting Bull Talks with the Signal Reporter and Unburdens a Grief or Two,” from The Signal, 1883.
b. Ghost Dance Manuscript,” by George E. Hyde, 1947.
c. excerpt regarding a congressional committee visit to Standing Rock Agency, and an interview with Sitting Bull, ca. 1883.
d. "Mary Collins Tells of the Dances of the Sioux and the Influence Held by Sitting Bull,” n.d.
e. excerpts regarding the Indian police at Standing Rock Agency, n.d.
5Research correspondence regarding reservation life.
a. correspondence from the Minnesota Historical Society regarding their manuscript collections, and information on Sitting Bull in St. Paul, Minnesota, 1929.
b. correspondence from The Walker Lithographing and Printing Company regarding scout E. H. Allison, 1929.
c. a typescript from the State Historical Society of North Dakota regarding Catherine Weldon’s relationship with of Sitting Bull, 1932.
d. correspondence with Gerry Theisen regarding White Bull on the reservation, 1957.
6Typescripts of correspondence and reports by Indian agent James McLaughlin.
a. a report on Standing Rock Agency by James McLaughlin, including the population and location of the agency, 1882.
b. typescript correspondence from James McLaughlin to Phillip Wells regarding the accompaniment of Wells on a Sioux buffalo hunt, 1883.
c. correspondence from McLaughlin to Matokokipapi (Afraid of Bear) and Shavehead, in Sioux with English translation, 1890.
7Typescript excerpts from interviews with Sitting Bull.
a. “Sitting Bull in Camp: Interview with One of General Custer’s Murderers…,” from the Evening Journal, 1885.
b. “Sitting Bull: A Chat with the Old Warrior-His Version of the Custer Massacre-The President’s Policy in Treatment of the Indians and Other Topics, from the Saginaw Evening News, 1885.
c. “Sitting Bull: A Half Hour in the Tent of the Great Sioux Chief-He Talks about the Campaign Against His People,” from the Evening Leader, 1885.
d. “Sitting Bull: The Herald Interviews the Great Chief and Ascertains His Position Toward the Whites,” from The Herald, 1885.
e. “Sitting Bull: A Chat with the Famous Chief and his Partner, Crow Eagle. An Unusual Gathering in the Southern Hotel Parlor Yesterday,” from the St. Louis Critic, 1885.
f. “The Wild West,” from the St. Louis Globe Democrat, 1885.
g. Interview of Sitting Bull at the Southern Hotel, including Sitting Bull’s opinions of the white man and his customs, from the St. Louis Critic. 1885.
h. excerpt from The Great Divide, “Sitting Bull: the Great Medicine Man of the Dacotahs” by H. Beaugrand, based on Beaugrand’s meeting with Sitting Bull in Canada, in 1885. 1891.
i. excerpt regarding an interview with Sitting Bull at Fort Walsh, Canada, including a description of Sitting Bull, n.d.
8Various typescripts of newspaper clippings regarding Sitting Bull.
a. “The Surrender of Sitting Bull,” from the New York Herald, 1881.
b. “The Chiefs Arrive: Sitting Bull, Gall and other Sioux Arrive in St. Paul,” from the St. Paul Dispatch. Includes descriptions of Sitting Bull and other chiefs on their way to Washington, D.C., 1888.
c. “On to Washington: The Chiefs from Standing Rock Go East to Visit Grover and Talk Over the Treaty,” from the Pioneer Press. Includes descriptions of Sitting Bull and other chiefs in Washington, D.C., and the chiefs’ ideas on the proposed treaty, 1888.
d. a news clipping by C. N. Herreid regarding Sitting Bull’s death and Herreid’s personal opinion of Sitting Bull, 1891.
e. “Visit to St. Paul of Old-Time Indian Agent Recalls Days of New Ulm Massacre of Whites,” from the St. Paul Daily News. Includes an interview with Major James McLaughlin regarding Sitting Bull, 1923.
f. news clipping from the Great Falls Tribune regarding weapons which belonged to Sitting Bull, 1933.
g. article by Luman U. Spehr of the Pioneer Press regarding the Ghost Dance, 1923.
9Typescript excerpts from published sources regarding Sitting Bull.
a. excerpt regarding Sitting Bull’s protection of the Nez Perce, from New Sources of Indian History, 1877.
b. “Sitting Bull,” from Wild Life on the Plains and Horrors of Indian Warfare, by W. L. Holloway, 1891.
c. an article regarding the source of Sitting Bull’s power, from Century Magazine, 1892.
d. excerpt, “Sitting Bull,” by James Creelman, from On the Great Highway, 1901.
e. excerpt, “Father Hugonard and Sitting Bull,” by John Hawkes, from The Story of Saskatchewan and Its People, 1924.
f. excerpt from A Narrative of Indian Trading and Acquaintance with Little Crow by Auguste L. Larpenteur, n.d.
10Typescripts regarding Sitting Bull.
a. “Sitting Bull Once Made a Sacrifice and Atonement for his People,” n.d.
b. “Some Account of Sitting Bull as an Indian Trader,” n.d.
c. typescripts of stories about the life of Sitting Bull, n.d.
11Typescript research materials regarding the life of Sitting Bull.
a. correspondence from Paul Richard to Sitting Bull, 1883.
b. typescript of “History of Sitting Bull,” by Bird M. Robinson, former secretary to Major James McLaughlin, regarding the death of Sitting Bull, 1891.
c. excerpt from Sitting Bull-The Irreconcilable, n.d.
d. typescripts regarding the Ghost Shirt, Ghost Dance, and an outline of the life of Sitting Bull, n.d.
Box 114
Folder
Research Materials Regarding the Life and Death of Sitting Bull for Sitting Bull, Champion of the Sioux: A Biography
1Research correspondence regarding Sitting Bull in Canada.
a. correspondence from Saskatchewan Indian agent regarding Sitting Bull camps in Canada, 1923-1930.
b. correspondence with the Public Archives of Canada regarding Sitting Bull in Canada, 1928-1930.
c. correspondence with Norman F. Black regarding Louis LeGare, 1929.
d. correspondence with Buffalo Child Long Lance regarding Sitting Bull and the Northwest Mounted Police, 1929.
e. correspondence with the Northwest Mounted Police regarding veterans who remember Sitting Bull, 1929-1932.
f. correspondence from in Alberta Indian Agent regarding the relationship of Sitting Bull and Crowfoot, a Blackfoot chief, 1930.
g. correspondence with the State Historical Society of North Dakota regarding the charges and trial of scout E. H. Allison, 1932.
h. excerpt from A History of Saskatchewan and the Old Northwest by Norman F. Black, n.d.
i. miscellaneous correspondence from Campbell regarding members of the police, Indians, or agents who remember the Sitting Bull term in Canada, 1929-1937.
2Typescript excerpts from published works regarding Sitting Bull.
a. “A Brief Account of Some Experiences Among the Prairie and Wood Indians of Saskatchewan from 1874 to 1903.”
b. excerpt from “Hunting Sitting Bull,” by John Gibbon from The American Catholic Quarterly Review, 1877.
c. typescripts of correspondence to Sitting Bull, 1882-1890.
d. excerpts from History of the Northwest by A. Begg, 1895.
e. excerpts from The Royal Northwest Mounted Police, A Corps History by Ernest J. Chambers, 1906.
f. excerpts from Riders of the Plains by A. L. Haydon, 1910.
g. excerpt from The Silent Force by T. M. Longstrength, 1927.
h. “The Mounted Police Detachment at Wood Mountain and Its Activities from the Organization of the Force in 1873 until 1882,” by Vernon LaChance, n.d.
i. excerpt from Heroes of the Plains by J. W. Bual, n.d.
j. excerpt from A History of Saskatchewan and the Old Northwest by Norman F. Black, n.d.
3Research notes and typescripts from Sessional Papers of the Canadian government, records of the Department of State, and records of the Northwest Mounted Police.
a. a report of the Commissioner of the Northwest Mounted Police, 1874.
b. typescript correspondence from Fort McLeod, 1876.
c. excerpts from the Sessional Papers of Canada, 1877.
d. typescript excerpts from The Surrender of Sitting Bull, by E. H. Allison, n.d.
4Typescript excerpts and correspondence regarding the life of Sitting Bull.
a. “The Surrender of Sitting Bull,” by Linda Slaughter, 1881.
b. excerpt from The Canadian Magazine, “The Surrender of Sitting Bull,” by F. C. Wade, 1905.
c. correspondence from Joseph B. Thoburn of the Oklahoma Historical Society regarding Charles F. Christy, 1928.
d. correspondence with Matthew F. Steele regarding a portrait of Sitting Bull, and the later life of Sitting Bull, 1929.
5Research correspondence regarding the death of Sitting Bull.
a. correspondence with Dr. A. R. Chapin regarding William F. “Buffalo Bill” Cody in Dakota Territory, 1928.
b. correspondence with the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, 1929.
c. correspondence with A. L. Bloomer regarding his knowledge of Sitting Bull, 1929.
d. correspondence with E. S. Woodruff regarding memories of her father’s role in the history of the West, 1957.
e. correspondence from L. J. Murphy regarding standing guard over Sitting Bull’s body, 1957.
f. news clippings of reviews for Sitting Bull, Champion of the Sioux: A Biography, n.d.
g. general research correspondence, 1953-1957.
6Typescript research correspondence regarding the death of Sitting Bull.
a. correspondence from the Department of the Interior to John Burke, Standing Rock Indian agent, regarding the fact that movements by Sitting Bull off the reservation will be viewed as hostile actions, and will be met with military force, 1875.
b. correspondence from the Department of the Interior to the Commissioner of Indian Affairs regarding the movements of Sitting Bull off the reservation, 1875.
c. correspondence from R. S. Mackenzie to the A. A. A. General regarding his report on the Powder River expedition, 1876.
d. correspondence from Catherine Weldon to James McLaughlin, 1881.
e. correspondence from James McLaughlin to P. Wells regarding orders for Indian police to accompany the Sioux on a hunting party to ensure their return, 1883.
f. correspondence from James McLaughlin to William H. Lyon regarding Indian assimilation and supplies for Indians, 1883.
g. typescript of printed advertisements and opinions of Red Cloud as a speaker, 1888.
h. correspondence from “Your Grait Manitoo” to Sitting Bull regarding rituals that Sitting Bull should follow in order to be successful on raids, 1889.
i. correspondence from James McLaughlin to the Commissioner of Indian Affairs regarding McLaughlin’s attempts to stop Sitting Bull’s ghost dances, 1890.
j. correspondence from James Carignan to James McLaughlin regarding Sitting Bull and the dancing Sioux on the reservation, 1890. k. correspondence from James McLaughlin to J. T. Morgan, Commissioner of Indian Affairs, regarding attempts to persuade Sitting Bull to stop the ghost dances, 1890.
l. correspondence from White Buffaloman to Sitting Bull requesting assistance since he was arrested for not stopping the ghost dances, 1890.
m. correspondence from James Carignan to James McLaughlin regarding Bull Head’s request to be allowed to arrest Sitting Bull for not stopping the ghost dances, 1890.
n. orders from Louis Primeau to Afraid of Bear to do what is necessary to prevent Sitting Bull from leaving the reservation, 1890.
o. correspondence from Sitting Bull to the U.S. Indian Agency regarding Sitting Bull’s justification of the ghost dances, 1890.
p. correspondence from James McLaughlin to the Commissioner of Indian Affairs regarding the death of Sitting Bull, and the losses on both sides, 1890.
q. correspondence from James McLaughlin to Afraid of Bear and Shaved Head regarding the orders to arrest Sitting Bull, 1890.
r. report of Lt. Col. W. F. Drum regarding the death of Sitting Bull and the events that followed, 1890.
s. typescript regarding the casualties of the police and of Sitting Bull’s followers when the police attempted to arrest Sitting Bull, 1890.
t. correspondence regarding the Ghost Dance and the Sioux leaving the reservation prior to Sitting Bull’s death. Includes reports and letters from Captain E. Fechet, W. F. Drum, James McLaughlin, and James Carignan, 1890-1891.
u. typescripts and telegram notes regarding activities on the Sioux reservation after the death of Sitting Bull, 1891.
v. correspondence from Spotted Mountain Sheep and Plenty Eagle to Kills Standing and One Bull, 1891.
w. copy of correspondence from James McLaughlin regarding his opinion of Sitting Bull, n.d.
x. correspondence to and from James McLaughlin regarding the events which followed the death of Sitting Bull, n.d.
7Typescript of an unpublished statement by John Loneman, “The Arrest and Killing of Sitting Bull.”
8Typescript of “A Reminiscence of the Death of Sitting Bull” by Lt. Col. M. F. Steele.
9News clippings and typescripts regarding the death of Sitting Bull.
a. typescripts of the Sessional Papers of the Canadian government, 1880-1881.
b. typescripts of newspaper articles, 1881-1890.
c. “The Battle of Standing Rock,” by A. B. Welch from The Cloverleaf, 1930.
d. newspaper clipping regarding the death of Red Tomahawk, killer of Sitting Bull, 1931.
e. “The Passing of a Warrior,” from The Bismarck Capital regarding the death of Red Tomahawk, 1931.
f. “Sitting Bull but Crafty Coward,” by Mrs. W. K. Williams from the Fargo Forum, 1931.
g. “In the Interest of Truth,” from the Fargo Forum, 1932.
h. “Sitting Bull’s Death 47 Years Ago,” by R. Griffiths from The Daily Argus-Leader, 1937.
i. “Pioneer Kept Sitting Bull Death Watch,” from the Grand Valley Herald, n.d.
j. “And Thus Sitting Bull Died,” by Elmo Watson, n.d.
10Typescripts from My Friend the Indian by James McLaughlin which were deleted from the original manuscript.
11Typescript excerpts regarding Sitting Bull and his death.
a. excerpt regarding the number of cartridges on the policemen after the fight over the arrest of Sitting Bull, 1890.
b. excerpt from Ranching with Roosevelt by Lincoln Lang, n.d.
c. excerpt regarding the death of Sitting Bull by Frank Zahn, n.d.
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Research Materials on the Sioux for Sitting Bull, Champion of the Sioux: A Biography
1Research materials on the Sioux language.
a. a list of Sioux words with English translation, n.d.
b. a vocabulary of Sioux words and phrases, n.d.
2Typescript research materials on Sioux Indians, including the following topics:
a. the history of the Indian policemen, n.d.
b. the hunting of fresh meat, n.d.
c. Sioux signs on buffalo skulls, n.d.
d. family life and relations with other tribes and chiefs, n.d.
e. a drawing of Sioux scalping knives, n.d
3Typescript research materials on Sioux Indians.
a. an excerpt from D. D. Mitchell’s letter transmitting his report and treaty concluded at Fort Laramie with agent Thomas Fitzpatrick, 1851.
b. correspondence from the editor of the Missouri Daily Republican regarding elections in the Indian tribes, 1851.
c. excerpts from Life, Letters and Travels of Father Pierre-Jean de Smet, S. J., 1801-1873 by Hiram Martin Chittenden and Alfred Talbot Richardson, 1905.
d. excerpt from Washakie by Grace Raymond Hebard, 1930.
e. excerpt from Red Cloud’s Folk by George E. Hyde regarding Standing Bear, 1937.
4Typescript excerpts from Sioux Indian Painting, Part I: Paintings of the Sioux and Other Tribes of the Great Plains; Part II: The Art of Amos Bad Heart Buffalo. These excerpts are descriptions of the Sioux paintings used in this publication. The paintings described give an account of the Indian view of the Battle of the Little Big Horn River, and of daily Indian life.
5Typescript excerpt from The Sioux or Dakotas, Collections of the Minnesota Historical Society, Volume III, by the Reverend Thomas S. Williamson. Includes information regarding an Afro-American soldier at the Battle of the Little Big Horn River, and the horse George A. Custer was riding at the battle.
6Typescript excerpt from South Dakota Report and Historical Collections, Volume II, 1904. Includes information regarding Red Cloud.
7Typescript excerpt from Narrative of One Bull, Adopted Son of Sitting Bull, by Sister M. Inez Hilger.
8Typescript excerpts from The Life and Adventures of Frank Grouard by Joseph DeBarthe, 1894. Includes information on Indian captives.
9General research correspondence regarding the Sioux.
a. correspondence to Victor J. Evans regarding a Hunkpapa Sioux calendar, 1928-1929.
b. correspondence from D. F. MacCarthy regarding a comparison of the Sioux and Crow Indians, 1932.
c. correspondence to Angus McDonald regarding the Sioux attack on the Flathead camp on the Musselshell River in 1872, 1932.
d. correspondence from the National Park Service regarding Wind Cave, 1937.
e. correspondence from Campbell to Life regarding the Sioux belief that cranes are dangerous to children, 1943.
f. correspondence to and from Westerners Brand Book regarding Sioux burials and rites, 1947.
g. correspondence Holiday Magazine regarding mistakes made by another author about the Sioux, including a Sioux written language, Red Cloud, Sitting Bull, and Crazy Horse, 1948.
10Notes by Campbell from Teton Dakota, a manuscript by Royal B. Hassrick regarding the general customs of the Sioux, including feathers, food, and buffalo.
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Research Notes on Sitting Bull for Sitting Bull, Champion of the Sioux: A Biography
1Research notes by Campbell on Sitting Bull, and related sources of published information.
2Research notes by Campbell on the life of Sitting Bull.
3Research notes by Campbell on the life of Sitting Bull.
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Research Materials Regarding Indians of the Southwest
1Research materials on Indian agencies and schools.
a. correspondence to and from the Office of Indian Affairs regarding the names and addresses of Indian agents, 1913-1954.
b. Directory of Indian Service Units, U.S. Department of the Interior, Office of Indian Affairs, 1933. Includes Indian schools and agencies.
c. a list of Indian reservations and tribes by state, from the U.S. Department of the Interior, Office of Indian Affairs, 1947.
2Correspondence and research materials regarding bibliographies on Indians of the Southwest.
a. correspondence from the Smithsonian Institution regarding bibliographic material, 1913-1939.
b. correspondence with the Library of Congress regarding bibliographic material, 1928-1957.
c. correspondence with the University of Oklahoma Library regarding bibliographic material, 1954-1957.
d. miscellaneous bibliographic material, 1929-1956.
3Research materials on the buffalo.
a. excerpts from Collections of the State Historical Society of North Dakota, Volume V, 1923, regarding buffalo hunting.
b. correspondence with E. S. Sutton regarding buffalo hunting and the migration of buffalo due to the white man, 1940.
4Research correspondence and typescript excerpts regarding general Indian culture and customs. The correspondents include E. S. Sutton, Alice Marriott, J. A. Falch, and others, regarding:
a. Indian smoking and peyote cults.
b. Indian birch bark canoes and log canoes.
c. deer hunting.
d. snowshoes.
e. Indian artifacts.
f. an Indian toy, the “bull-roarer.”
g. the religious belief that the turtle is the supporter of the earth.
h. the wild rose as food and medicine.
i. what the whites were called by the different tribes.
j. the use of the cedar tree.
k. the belief in the crow and the raven.
l. trading among the tribes.
m. Indian society, and the lack of crimes and murders.
n. the significance of the eagle plume.
o. Indian music.
p. Indian beadwork.
q. Indian etiquette.
r. the thunderbird symbol.
s. the general attitudes and character of the Indian.
t. women’s buffalo call.
5Research correspondence and typescript excerpts on Indian dances.
a. correspondence to and from Gene Price regarding the sun dance, 1949.
b. “The Third Dance,” from Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History, n.d.
c. a typescript of “Sun Dance Suite,” Parts I-V, n.d.
d. miscellaneous correspondence regarding dances, 1934-1955.
6Research correspondence to and from Byron A. Ashley regarding Indian burial rites.
7General research correspondence regarding Indians.
a. correspondence with the State Historical Society of North Dakota regarding Indian population figures for 1890, 1930.
b. typescript of a program for the dedication of a memorial for deceased chiefs of the Cheyenne River Sioux tribe, and for tribal members who died in service during World War I, 1932.
c. typescript of Ethnologic Project Among Oklahoma Indians, by K. G. Orr, 1945.
d. correspondence with the United States Mint regarding the purchase of Indian peace medals, 1946.
e. research correspondence regarding general information on Indians, 1928-1949.
8Research notes and typescript excerpts regarding horses.
a. typescript excerpt, “Horses of the Plains,” by Frederic Remington, 1889.
b. correspondence with Mrs. Bert E. Heisler regarding the Indians’ handling of horses, 1949.
c. copies of correspondence from H. P. “Tex” Willis regarding Indian ponies, 1954-1955.
d. general research notes by Campbell regarding horses, n.d.
9Typescript research materials on humor, including typescripts of Indian jokes and humor, reflecting their understanding of the ways of the white man.
10Research correspondence and typescript excerpts regarding Indian languages.
a. correspondence from the U.S. Department of the Interior, Indian School Service, 1903. Includes a list of Indian words and phrases with pronunciation.
b. correspondence from Maude B. Wensley regarding her father’s notes on the Sioux language, 1930.
c. correspondence with Bella Weitzner regarding a Shoshone dictionary, 1947.
d. handmade Indian flash cards, n.d.
e. a printed list of Indian symbols and their descriptions, n.d.
f. general correspondence regarding Indian languages, 1945-1955.
11Research materials on Indian paintings.
a. photocopied excerpt, “The Catlin Collection of Indian Paintings,” from the Report of the National Museum, 1890.
b. research notes by Campbell regarding Indian paintings, n.d.
12Correspondence with the Smithsonian Institution regarding photographs and requests for prints.
13Research correspondence and typescript excerpts regarding Indian pipes.
a. correspondence to and from Joseph Balmer regarding Indian pipe smoking, 1946.
b. a drawing of a buffalo pipe, n.d.
c. an untitled typescript by Campbell regarding the use of pipes by Indians, n.d.
d. research notes by Campbell regarding pipe use by Indians, and its significance, n.d.
14Research correspondence and typescript excerpts regarding the Indian police.
a. a typescript excerpt from Apache Agent, The Story of John P. Clum by Woodworth Clum, 1936.
b. correspondence to and from William T. Hagan regarding the origins of the Indian police, 1956.
c. a typescript entitled, “The Exploits of the Indian Police,” n.d.
15Research materials on Indian events and pageants.
a. typescript of a program for the dedication of a memorial for deceased chiefs of the Cheyenne River Sioux tribe, and for tribal members who died in service during World War I, 1932.
b. a printed program for All American Indian Days, 1955.
c. correspondence from F. H. Sinclair from the Kalif Management Corporation, regarding the Miss Indian Pageant and Campbell’s participation as a judge, 1955.
d. a typescript of “Minutes of Indian Committee Meeting, All American Indian Days,” 1956.
e. newspaper clipping, “Pawnee Maiden From Utah Chosen ‘Miss Indian America’ At Sheridan” from The Boulder Daily Camera, 1956.
f. ticket stubs for All American Indian Days events, 1956.
g. a printed program for All American Indian Days, 1957.
h. a list of Miss Indian Pageant contestants, n.d.
i. Campbell’s judge scorecard for the Miss Indian Pageant, n.d.
j. Campbell’s semi-final choices for the Miss Indian Pageant, n.d.
k. newspaper clipping, “Utah Girl Chosen Miss Indian America,” n.d.
l. a typescript of “National Recognition of All American Indian Days,” by Karl D. Bell, president of Kalif Management Corporation, n.d.
16A list of biographies to be included in Great Americans of Indian Blood.
17Research materials on Conchise.
a. typescript excerpt from the Handbook of American Indians North of Mexico regarding Conchise, 1907.
b. research correspondence to and from John Selby regarding Conchise and Oliver La Farge, 1947.
18Research materials regarding Geronimo.
a. photocopy of “Geronimo, Chief of the Apaches,” by E. A. Burbank from The Border, 1908.
b. with the Oklahoma Historical Society regarding Geronimo and the Shawnee Cattle Trail, 1957.
c. correspondence with Jim Kjelgaard regarding the origin of Geronimo’s name, 1957.
d. a photocopied excerpt from the Report of the Secretary of War, n.d.
e. photocopy of “The Geronimo Campaign,” by Brigadier General James Parker, n.d.
f. typescript excerpt regarding military maneuvers in the capture of Geronimo, n.d.
g. research notes by Campbell on Geronimo, n.d.
h. general correspondence regarding Geronimo, 1957.
19A typescript excerpt entitled, “Chief Gaul.” Includes information on Rain-in-the-Face.
20Research materials regarding Quanah Parker.
a. correspondence from H. P. “Tex” Willis regarding Quanah Parker, 1954.
b. excerpt from the Bureau of American Ethnology regarding the life of Quanah Parker, n.d.
21Typescript excerpt from the Bureau of American Ethnology regarding the life of Pushmataha and the Choctaw.
22Research materials regarding Sacajawea.
a. printed U.S. Senate documents regarding a proposed monument to Sacajawea, 1949.
b. typescript correspondence from Charles Eagle Plume regarding Sacajawea’s tribe and life, 1957.
23Typescript excerpt from the Bureau of American Ethnology regarding the life of Satank, also known as Setangya, or Sitting Bear.
24Research materials regarding Satanta.
a. typescript excerpt from the Bureau of American Ethnology regarding the life of Satanta, n.d.
b. research notes by Campbell regarding Satanta, n.d.
25Typescript excerpt from the Bureau of American Ethnology regarding the life of Sequoyah.
26Correspondence with Ernest V. Sutton regarding Indian medical cures.
27Miscellaneous research materials.
a. “The Marvels in our Museums: American Indians,” from Collier’s, 1955.
b. correspondence with John C. Ewers, Smithsonian Institution, regarding Campbell’s plan for a museum dedicated to the history of the Episcopal Church in Oklahoma, 1957.
A typescript summary of the life of Ely Samuel Parker.
Correspondence from M. P. Satterlee regarding Inkpa-duta.
Correspondence from the University of Wyoming regarding the nomination of Frightening Bear as chief of the Sioux in 1851.
Research materials on Crazy Horse.
a. correspondence to and from Eleanor Hinman regarding the war record of Crazy Horse, 1932.
b. correspondence to and from James H. McGregor regarding photographs of Crazy Horse, 1935.
c. correspondence from James Cerruti regarding a photograph of Crazy Horse, 1948.
d. photocopy of newspaper clipping, “Chief Crazy Horse’s Haircut,” regarding a memorial to Crazy Horse, n.d.
e. typescript summaries by Campbell of the lives of Crazy Horse, Sitting Bull, Roman Nose, Buffalo Bill, and Joseph L. Meek, n.d.
f. general correspondence regarding Crazy Horse, 1948-1957.
Research materials regarding Red Cloud.
a. correspondence with Maurice Frink regarding a photograph of a delegation headed by Red Cloud, 1948.
b. typescript excerpt regarding Red Cloud, n.d.
Typescript excerpts from the unpublished memoirs of Philip Faribault Wells, “95 Years Among the Indians of the Northwest.”
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1Research materials on scalping.
a. correspondence from Charles F. McCombs, 1929.
b. correspondence from McKeen F. Morrow, 1929-1930.
c. newspaper clipping “Bonus on Dead Indians Lacks State Authority,” from The Idaho Statesman, 1938.
2Research materials on trade with Indians.
a. typescript excerpt from Sheridan’s Troopers on the Borders: A Winter Campaign on the Plains by De B. Randolph Keim, 1870.
b. typescript excerpt from the Collections of the Minnesota Historical Society, “Indian Traders: Their Reputed, and Their True Character,” n.d.
3Research materials on Indian treaties.
a. typescript excerpt regarding the Medicine Lodge Treaty of 1867, n.d.
b. typescript excerpt regarding the Treaty of Laramie in 1868, n.d.
c. correspondence from Campbell regarding treaties he is researching, 1946.
4Research materials on Apache Indians.
a. photocopy of “The Apache Indian,” by E. A. Burbank from Carter’s Monthly, 1899.
b. “A Historical Novel about the Apache Wars,” by Oliver La Farge, regarding Elliott Arnold’s novel about Apaches, 1947.
c. correspondence to Elizabeth Kaderli regarding the Chiricahua and Mescalero Apaches, 1955.
d. Typescript excerpt, “Apache,” from the Handbook of American Indians, n.d.
e. Typescript excerpt, “Chiricahua,” from the Handbook of American Indians, n.d.
5Research materials on Blackfoot Indians.
a. typescript excerpt from the Journal of the Washington Academy of Sciences regarding medicine wheels, 1954.
b. correspondence from F. M. Setzler regarding the Matoki Society of the Blackfoot, 1956.
c. typescript of “The O-Kan’ (Sun Dance),” regarding a Blackfoot ceremony, n.d.
d. typescript, “How the Blackfeet Band of Sioux Got Its Name” by Robert P. Higheagle, n.d.
6Research materials on Cheyenne Indians. Correspondence to and from Clark Wissler regarding the Cheyenne Dog Soldiers.
7Research materials on Choctaw Indians. Correspondence to and from the Department of the Interior, Office of the Five Civilized Tribes, regarding information on Choctaw laws and the Choctaw treaties of 1855 and 1865.
8Research materials on Comanche Indians. Research notes by Campbell on the Comanche.
9Research materials on Crow Indians. Typescript of “The Crow Indians,” by Robert H. Lowie.
10Research materials on Delaware Indians. Correspondence to Fred Woodard regarding information on a man named “Gray” and his association with the Delaware. Includes a reference to kinship between the Delaware and the Rockaway.
11Research materials on Flathead Indians. Typescript of “General Information about the Flathead Reservation in Western Montana.”
12Research materials on Kiowa Indians.
a. correspondence from Alice L. Marriott regarding James Mooney’s Calendar History of the Kiowa Indians, 1936.
b. correspondence to and from Lawrence Ware regarding “Kiowa Dutch,” a captive of the Kiowa and friend of Kit Carson, 1940.
c. typescript excerpt regarding the history and character of the Kiowa, n.d.
13Research materials on Navajo Indians. Typescript of “Report on the First Navajo Tribal Fair, Window Rock, September 16-18,” by Margaret McKittrick, n.d.
14Research materials on Nez Perce Indians.
a. correspondence to the Northern Idaho Agency regarding Tou-u-len-en, a chief and father-in-law of Joseph L. Meek, 1948.
b. correspondence to the Bureau of American Ethnology regarding Tou-u-len-en, n.d.
15Research materials on Osage Indians. Correspondence to and from A. Wetmore regarding information on the Osage chief Bacon Rind.
16Research materials on Pawnee Indians. Correspondence with Brummett Echohawk regarding Pawnee tipis.
17Research materials on Rockaway Indians.
a. correspondence to the Bureau of American Ethnology regarding information on the Rockaway of Canada, 1947.
b. correspondence with Fred B. Woodard regarding Rockaway Indians, 1948.
18Research materials on Ute Indians. Typescript of “Absentee Utes: 1906,” included with correspondence from H. E. Maguire.
19Research materials on Indian warfare and officers of the U.S. Army.
a. Typescript of “Frank North: A Leader of Men,” from The Fighting Norths and Pawnee Scouts by Robert Bruce, 1932.
b. correspondence from J. William DeGrange regarding a list of subjects in the Archives of the Corps of Engineers, War Department, 1933.
c. a form letter by Campbell addressed to “Dear Lieutenant,” regarding ways to be a good officer, 1942.
d. correspondence with Nell A. Snider regarding the Indian wars, 1945.
e. correspondence with Mary O’Grady of the United Indian War Veterans, regarding veterans of the Ute campaign, 1956.
f. a typescript biography of Patrick Edward Connor from the Dictionary of American Biography, n.d.
g. miscellaneous correspondence regarding the descendants of army officers, 1928-1956.
20Research materials regarding Indian warfare and battles.
a. correspondence with T. J. Gatchell regarding the Wagon Box Fight, 1933.
b. typescript of “Absentee Utes: 1906,” included with correspondence from H. E. Maguire, 1933.
c. correspondence with the Wyoming State Library regarding maps of battles, 1933.
d. correspondence with Raymond A. Burnside regarding battlefield maps, 1933.
e. correspondence with Don Russell of The Chicago Daily News regarding General Charles King, 1945.
f. correspondence with the War Records Division of the National Archives regarding casualties of the Battle of the Washita River, 1947.
g. correspondence with W. E. Rosebush regarding Indian casualty discrepancies, 1956-1957.
h. a chart showing lists of battles between the Indians and the U.S. Army, the officers involved, number of killed and wounded on each side, and dates of battles, n.d.
i. general correspondence regarding Indian warfare and battles, 1933-1957.
21Research materials on Indian warfare and military campaigns.
a. printed map of the route of 10th Cavalry Troops Punitive Expedition of 1916 in Mexico.
b. typescript of “Baldwin Indian Territory Expedition, from His Own Diaries,” n.d.
c. typescript of “The Indian Territory Expedition of 1874,” by Lemuel T. Wilson, n.d.
d. typescript of “Indian Fighter Sees Action,” by Lemuel T. Wilson, n.d.
e. typescript of “Indian Fighters Escape by Capturing Lone Prowler and Avoiding Main Encampment,” by Lemuel T. Wilson, n.d.
f. typescript of “Desperate Indian Fighting Near Fort Elliott Site is Delineated by Noted Scout,” by Lemuel T. Wilson, n.d.
g. typescript of “Scout with Lieut. Baldwin in Panhandle in 1874 Is Contributor to News,” by W. C. Brown, n.d.
h. typescript of “Baldwin’s Original Report of Redwater Fight,” n.d.
22Correspondence with Colonel William Paxton regarding the Battle of Wounded Knee.
23Research materials on the Battle of the Rosebud.
a. correspondence with Lt. Col. Wilfred Jackson regarding Gen. George Crook and the Battle of the Rosebud, 1948.
b. correspondence with Merrill J. Mattes regarding a monument to the Battle of the Rosebud, 1949.
c. notes regarding the Battle of the Rosebud, the Reynolds Fight, the Battle of the Washita River, the Battle of Sand Creek, and the Battle of the Little Big Horn River, n.d.
24Research materials regarding the Fetterman Fight.
a. newspaper clipping, “The Bravery of Our Bugler Is Much Spoken of...,” by Elmo Scott Watson, 1940.
b. typescript of “Agenda on the Fort Phil Kearny Bugler Story,” from The Sioux Wars by Charles E. DeLand, n.d.
25Correspondence to Campbell from Dorothy Gardiner regarding the Battle of Sand Creek, and the life of John M. Chivington.
26Research materials regarding the torture of captives by Indian tribes.
a. typescript correspondence from George Bird Grinnell regarding the lack of torture by Indians, 1929.
b. correspondence from the Bureau of American Ethnology regarding Indian torture of captives, 1934.
27Research materials regarding general warfare.
a. a letter to the editor by Campbell regarding Fort Reno, 1878.
b. correspondence from Kenneth W. Porter regarding Indian drill maneuvers to bugle calls, 1935.
c. correspondence from E. A. Hawks regarding Indian guns, 1939.
d. correspondence with Bruce Siberts regarding guns surrendered by Sitting Bull’s band, 1940.
28Research materials regarding Indian warriors.
a. correspondence with H. L. Davis regarding Indian methods of warfare, 1933.
b. correspondence with Alfred Powell regarding the Cheyenne Dog Soldiers, 1942-1943.
c. correspondence with Don Russell regarding the reliability of Indians as warriors and army scouts, 1956.
d. Research materials regarding Indian warriors correspondence with Jack Spears regarding Campbell’s help on an article about how Indians have been depicted in films, 1957.
29Research materials regarding Indian weapons.
a. correspondence with John Jones regarding Sioux and Cheyenne bow-and-arrow shooting techniques, 1957.
b. typescript of “The Metal Arrow Points Found in Texas County, Oklahoma,” by Vincent Dale, n.d.
c. general correspondence regarding Indian weapons, 1947-1956.
30Research materials regarding Indian war bonnets and war paint.
a. correspondence with F. H. Douglas regarding a war bonnet and a scalp shirt, 1947.
b. correspondence with S. Omar Barker regarding how war paint was made, 1953.
c. correspondence with Harold Raff regarding how war paint was made, 1954.
31Research materials regarding Indian welfare.
a. typescript of “Justification for Proposed Work in the Northern Plains Area,” by Morris Burge, 1938.
b. typescript of “Big Business Seeks Eviction of Alaskan Indians from their Fishing Grounds,” from the Association on American Indian Affairs, Inc., 1948.
c. typescript of “Background of the Karluk Case,” from the Association on American Indian Affairs, Inc., 1948.
d. a printed summary of 1954 legislation on the Indian Bureau.
e. a printed speech by Commissioner of Indian Affairs Glenn L. Emmons at a meeting of the Muskogee Chamber of Commerce, Muskogee, Oklahoma, 1955.
f. a printed address by Commissioner of Indian Affairs Glenn L. Emmons at the Triennial Conference of the National Fellowship of Indian Workers, Estes Park, delivered by Thomas M. Reid, 1955.
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1An original bound volume of Bureau of American Ethnology 14th Annual Report 1892-1893, featuring “The Ghost-Dance Religion and the Sioux Outbreak of 1890,” by James Mooney.
2Reprint of “Bird Lore and Bird Songs of the North American Indian,” by N. W. Jipson.
3Adventure Magazine which includes brief information regarding Sitting Bull in Canada.
4House of Representatives Bill 7902 regarding Indian self government.
5American Indian Life bulletin, “Congress Did Not Fail.”
6Typescript and printed materials regarding the National Gallery of the American Indian.
7Program for the American Indian Exposition in Anadarko, Oklahoma.
8A map of Indian agencies and reservations.
9Photocopied materials regarding Pyramid Lake Paiute claims against the federal government and several Congressional acts.
10Program for All American Indian Days.
11Meeting minutes of the American Indian Institute, Second Annual Conference, University of Oklahoma.
12Reprint of “Federal Indian Policy and the Southern Cheyennes and Arapahos, 1887-1907,” by Donald J. Berthrong from Ethnohistory.
13Reprint of “Indian Claims,” by Oliver LaFarge from the Congressional Record.
14Typescript of History of Plum Creek Massacre & Captivity of Mrs. Thomas F. Morton by Wayne W. Polk.
15Typescript of a speech by T. E. de Shazo at the reburial of Quanah Parker and Cynthia Ann Parker at Fort Sill.
16Newsletter of the American Indian Fund and the Association on American Indian Affairs, Inc., Supplement to No. 20, “The Seneca Nation Speaks.”
17Magazine article, “Ma-Ka-Tai-Me-She-Kia-Kiah,” by Tim McCoy, regarding the Black Hawk War.
18“The Sioux,” from Holiday Magazine.
19“The Red Man’s Burden,” by Francis E. Leupp, Hearst’s Magazine.
20A Canadian postcard depicting the killing of Jean de Brebeuf and Gabriel Lalemant by the Iroquois in 1648-1649.
21Booklet entitled, “Pendleton Indian Robes: The Wild Indian’s Overcoat."
22Booklet entitled, “Genuine Indian Beadwork and Art Goods,” by the Mohonk Lodge, Colony, Oklahoma.
23A photocopy of Apache Indian playing cards.
24Article, “Ute Indians Hit A $31.7 Million Jackpot,” regarding a payment to the Ute Indians by the U.S. Court of Claims.
25A photocopy of “The Iroquois Creed,” signed by members of the Akwesasne Mohawk Counselor Organization.
26A printed flyer regarding a memorial to Deganawidah.
27Printed materials regarding the Akwesasne Mohawk Counselor Organization.
Research Materials Regarding the Life and Death of Sitting Bull for Sitting Bull, Champion of the Sioux: A Biography
28Miscellaneous printed text and images of Indians and tipis.
Research Materials Regarding Indians of the Southwest
29Miscellaneous printed materials regarding Indians.
Box 120
Folder
Research Materials Regarding the U.S. Army
1Typescripts of military reports and a journal from Fort Dodge.
2Typescripts of military reports and correspondence.
a. correspondence regarding cavalry post assignments, 1867.
b. correspondence regarding supplies furnished for Indians at the Cheyenne and Arapaho Agency, 1878.
c. a report to the Post Adjutant, Fort Dodge from Charles E. Morse regarding the movements of Morse’s company, 1878.
d. telegrams sent between military officers, many of which were sent by General P. H. Sheridan, 1878-1879.
e. a report regarding the recapture of Cheyenne Indians, 1879.
f. a report regarding acts committed by Cheyenne Indians, 1879.
g. a report regarding incidents connected with the death of Lieutenant Colonel Lewis, 1879.
3Typescripts of military reports and correspondence.
a. correspondence between the Department of the Missouri and Fort Dodge regarding Satanta and Kiowa Indians, 1868.
b. reports from Fort Dodge regarding the movements of Kiowa and Cheyenne Indians, 1868.
c. reports from Fort Dodge regarding the sale of liquor to Indians, 1868.
d. reports regarding trading companies and supplies for Indians, 1868.
e. photocopied records of the Department of the Missouri regarding engagements with Indians at Big Sandy Creek, the destruction of a Comanche village, the defeat of Cheyenne under Black Kettle, the Battle of the Washita, and the Battle of Beaver Creek, 1868.
f. Records of the United States Army Commands, Selected Letters Received, 1868-1879, Department of Missouri. Includes information on General Alfred Sully’s campaign of 1868, and the report by General Sheridan regarding the number of Indians killed in 1868.
g. Records of the Office of the Adjutant General, General Orders, 1868-1874, Department of the Missouri.
h. excerpts from Selected Letters Received, Department of the Missouri, 1868-1879.
4Photocopies and typescripts of military reports, correspondence, and newspaper articles.
a. correspondence to the county attorney of Dodge City from the governor of Kansas, Thomas Andrew Osborne, 1873.
b. correspondence between Kansas state officials, including the governor, to Fort Dodge and Dodge City regarding lawlessness and the military assumption of law, 1873-1874.
c. photocopied reports from Fort Dodge regarding Dodge City, 1873-1874.
d. photocopied correspondence between Governor Thomas Andrew Osborne and Colonel Richard Irving Dodge, 1874.
e. newspaper reports from the Dodge City Times regarding military activity, 1877.
f. clipping of “It’s Worth Repeating: Ford County Kansas Is Born,” by Heinie Schmidt from The High Plains Journal, n.d.
5Typescript research materials regarding Fort Dodge.
a. a list of officers stationed at Fort Dodge, 1877.
b. typescripts from the Dodge City Times regarding Fort Dodge, 1877-1879.
c. article typescripts regarding the death of Colonel W. H. Lewis, commander of Fort Dodge, 1878.
d. correspondence with the Department of the Army regarding Fort Dodge and Colonel W. H. Lewis, 1948.
6Typescripts of correspondence received by the Secretary of War.
Box 121
Folder
1Typescript of “Roster of Certain Officers Mentioned in the Book with Their Service Records,” n.d.
2Typescript research materials regarding western military posts and forts.
a. summaries of the following military posts and forts:
1. Fort Brady, Michigan.
2. Fort Clark, Texas.
3. Fort Dodge, Kansas.
4. Fort Duncan, Texas.
5. Fort Garland, Colorado.
6. Fort Gibson, Indian Territory.
7. Post of Lauderdale, Mississippi.
8. Fort Leavenworth, Kansas.
9. Fort Lyon, Colorado.
10. Mt. Vernon Barracks, Alabama.
11. Fort Ringgold, Texas.
12. Fort Slocum, New York.
13. Fort Supply, Oklahoma.
14. Fort Wallace, Kansas.
15. Fort Wayne, Michigan.
b. a description of Fort Smith, Arkansas, and the history of its establishment and abandonment.
3Typescripts of records of U.S. Army patrols and campaigns.
a. a response by Major H. Douglas to General R. B. Marcy’s report on Fort Leavenworth, 1867.
b. Records of the Office of the Adjutant General, Fort Dodge, Kansas, 1873-1878, Reports and Journals of Scouts and Marches.
c. officers’ reports on campaigns and scouting missions near Fort Dodge, Kansas, 1874-1879.
4Typescripts of selected correspondence of the Department of the Missouri.
5Selected photocopies from Records of the War Department, U.S. Army Commands, Selected Correspondence, Military Division of the Missouri.
a. telegrams to General Phil Sheridan regarding Cheyenne movement north from Fort Reno to Kansas, 1878.
1. telegrams, September, 1878.
2. telegrams, October, 1878.
3. a telegram from General George Crook, 1878.
b. receipts of payments to Indian war veterans, n.d.
6Selected photocopies from Records of the War Department, Office of the Adjutant General, Medical History of Post, Fort Dodge, Kansas.
a. Fort Dodge monthly record, July, 1868.
b. Fort Dodge monthly record, August, 1868.
c. Fort Dodge monthly record, September, 1868.
d. Fort Dodge monthly record, October, 1868.
e. Fort Dodge monthly record, December, 1868.
f. Fort Dodge monthly record, January, 1869.
g. Fort Dodge monthly record, February, 1869.
h. Fort Dodge monthly record, April, 1869.
i. Fort Dodge monthly record, May, 1869.
j. Fort Dodge monthly record, January 10-16, 1873.
7a. special orders regarding the purchase of supplies to ransom the family of James Box, who were held captive by Kiowa Indians, 1866.
b. special orders regarding ration issues to the Kiowas, 1866.
c. special orders regarding ration issues to destitute Indians, 1866.
d. special orders regarding the sale of rations to civilians, 1866.
e. special orders regarding the escort to Fort Riley of the of the family of James Box, who were captured in Texas by Kiowa Indians, 1866.
f. special orders regarding the escort of Satanta to Zara, Kansas, to confer with Captain Jesse H. Leavenworth about annuities, 1867.
g. praise for the conduct of a sergeant who was mobbed by citizens while escorting a train and a deserter, 1867.
h. special orders regarding a squadron at the Cimarron River to intercept Cheyenne and Sioux who may try to cross, 1867.
i. special orders regarding escorting Satanta to General W. S. Hancock, 1867.
j. special orders regarding an assignment at “Lime Kiln,” Kansas, 1867.
k. special orders regarding the protection of the Southern Overland Mail by six stations, 1867.
l. special orders regarding the repair of temporary quarters, 1867.
m. special orders regarding Kansas cavalry recall, 1867.
n. special orders regarding the Treaty of Medicine Lodge, and the recall of guards on the Santa Fe Trail, 1867.
o. special orders to Fort Dodge regarding a new adjutant, 1867.
p. special orders regarding a scouting party sent to the scene of a train robbery by Indians, 1867.
q. special orders regarding mail guards restored after recent Indian depredations, 1867.
r. special orders regarding relief of men at stations for the protection of mail, 1867.
s. special orders regarding the reassignment of enlisted men on daily duty, 1868.
t. special orders regarding the appointment of a new Chief of Scouts, 1868.
u. special orders regarding the duties of scouts, 1868.
v. special orders regarding an escort for Indian captives, 1868.
w. special orders regarding a detail to record and stolen army mules, 1869.
x. special orders regarding a punishment detail, 1870.
y. special orders regarding scouts to the southwest, 1873.
z. special orders regarding the transport of a soldier to Leavenworth, 1873.
aa. special orders regarding a surgeon for ill soldiers guarding the railroad, 1873.
bb. special orders regarding scouts south and southwest of Dodge, 1873.
cc. special orders regarding troops sent to the Cimmaron River crossing to investigate Indians off the reservations, 1873.
dd. special orders regarding scouts southwest of Dodge, 1873.
ee. special orders regarding a detail to the quartermaster, 1873.
ff. special orders regarding scouts to the southwest, 1873.
gg. special orders regarding troops wearing side arms, 1873.
hh. special orders regarding passes to Dodge City, and reports to guards there, 1873.
ii. special orders regarding an escort to Fort Supply, 1873.
jj. special orders regarding scouts to the southwest, 1873.
kk. special orders regarding an officer and troops to investigate Indian depredations at Medicine Lodge, Kansas, 1873.
ll. special orders regarding a guard in trouble in Dodge City, Kansas, 1873.
mm. special orders regarding the Fort Dodge board of survey, 1873.
nn. special orders regarding scouts on the Cimmaron River, 1873.
oo. special orders regarding troops sent to the Arapaho agency to tell Little Raven to leave Kansas, 1873.
pp. special orders regarding the Fort Dodge board of survey, 1874.
qq. special orders regarding a scouting party against rustlers, and Indian movements, 1874.
rr. special orders regarding scouting reports and missions, 1874.
8A photograph of a drawn map of the Fetterman Fight.

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